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I'm looking for a way to count and number/rename files in a directory with a leading zero for the ones from 1-9. It must be based on File::find, although it might not to be the most efficient way, but later I have to integrate it in a much bigger code, which is based on that function and it would be difficult to rewrite. 'File1', 'File2', 'File3'....'File10', 'File11' etc to become '01. File1', '02. File2',... '10. File10', '11. File11' etc.

use strict; 
use warnings;
use File::Find;

find(\&rename_files, $dir_source); 
sub rename_files {
    /\.flac$/ or return;
    my $fd = $File::Find::dir;
    my $fn = $File::Find::name;
    my $file = $_;


    rename $file, $_;       
}

UPDATE: This is the working solution with one exception that the code starts to count the files from 0, although $count is set to 1.

 use strict; 
 use warnings;
 use File::Find; 

 my $dir_source = '';

 find(\&rename_files, $dir_source); 
{
    my $count = 1;
    sub rename_files {
        return if not -f $_ or not /\.flac$/;            
        my $file = sprintf "%02d\. $_", $count++;
        print "$file\n";
        rename $_, $file;
    }
 }
share|improve this question
    
Reading over the documentation it seems all you have to do is call find with the wanted subroutine trying to match $_ =~ /^\d\D/ and if so rename the file with a 0 appended to the name. Oh, and increment some count var to count them. –  NorthGuard Jun 28 '11 at 18:33
    
If the found files are missing 2 digits at the beginning - count & rename with leading 0 for the ones from 1 to 9 /01, 02, 03, ...10, 11 etc/. –  thebourneid Jun 28 '11 at 18:38
    
@thebourneid Can you update your question, it's not very clear what you want? It seems you have two cases, one where there are no digits at the beginning and another one where there's only 1 digit at the beginning. Add a couple of example files you would see and what you'd want them to be changed to would be nice. e.g. 1filename.txt => 01filename.txt and 11filename.txt => 11filename.txt –  NorthGuard Jun 28 '11 at 18:41
    
Sorry. My question was misleading indeed. I edited it and to summarize I'm looking for a way to count and number files without exceptions. –  thebourneid Jun 28 '11 at 19:01
    
The my $count is lexically scoped but is being referenced inside a subroutine which is called outside of that scope. Just ++$count and ignore the problem or switch to globals our() for $count. –  Seth Robertson Jun 28 '11 at 20:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may have to tweak this to match your specific needs, but I think it should point you in the right direction. By the way, I would recommend replacing the "rename $_, $file" line with 'print "rename $_, $file\n";' while in test/debug stage, so that you can just see what it would do if enabled, rather than what it did wrong after it's done. ;)

Here's the snippet:

use strict; 
use warnings;
use File::Find;

find(\&rename_files, $dir_source); 

{
    my $count = 0;
    sub rename_files {
        return if not /\.flac$/;
        my $file = $_;
        return if not -f $file;
        $file =~ s/^([^\d]{2})(?=\.)/sprintf "%2d$1", $count++/e;
        rename $_, $file;
    }
}

It uses a closure around $count to give your sub a counter, and a /e option on your substitution RE to execute the sprintf rather than just replacing with a literal string.

By the way, you're 95% there already with File::Find, but for future, perhaps less trivial tasks, I really like the clean interface of File::Find::Rule. You might look at it and see if it could be a better tool in the future.

UPDATE: Given the update to your original question, I would modify the code as follows:

use strict; 
use warnings;
use File::Find;

find(\&rename_files, $dir_source); 

{
    my $count = 0;
    sub rename_files {
        return if not -f $_ or not /\.flac$/;            
        my $file = sprintf "%2d$_", ++$count;
        rename $_, $file;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you DavidO. These are the 2 two lines from your suggestions that made it almost work for me after some testing: $file =~ s/^([^\d\d\.\s].*)$/sprintf "%02d\. $1", $count++/e; $file = sprintf "%02d\. $_", $count++; The only thing I can't figure out is how to count the files from 1 and not from 0. –  thebourneid Jun 28 '11 at 20:03
    
Change my $count = 0; to my $count = 1; That's where we set the starting number. –  DavidO Jun 28 '11 at 20:14
    
That's the first thing I did but the code still starts to count from zero and to rename the first file to '00' instead to '01'. –  thebourneid Jun 28 '11 at 20:28
    
Please post your code in an Update edit. Don't remove anything from the original post, just add an update section with your code snippet so that I can see what's wrong. I may not have time immediately, but will try asap. –  DavidO Jun 28 '11 at 20:32
    
DavidO many, many thanks for your assistance. Seth Robertson pointed out the problem that I must define $count outside the subroutine and the code works now. I'm not sure if I should post the final solution or you should edit your last suggestion. –  thebourneid Jun 28 '11 at 21:40

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