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I have a enum, lets call it A


public enum A
{
    A,
    B
}

I have a function that takes a enum A


public void functionA(A enumA)
{
    //do something
}

How can I create another enum, possibly call B that I can pass to functionA. Something like this?


public enum B
{
    C
}


functionA(B.C);

I know that you cant extend a enum, but what other options do I have available? What is the best way to achieve this?

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What are you hoping to accomplish by doing this? The reason functionA takes an A parameter is because it specifically expects only those values. Suppose you could somehow trick it into taking another value from an extended enum. How would the function know what to do with it? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 28 '11 at 18:43
    
Im trying to add a new enum that is similar to the existing one, but doesnt make sense to add the values too. I was hoping I wouldnt have to modify the function at all to handle it. –  user489041 Jun 28 '11 at 18:44
    
Please be more specific. It would help to talk about what the function actually does, and what the actual enumeration values are, and why the new enumeration ought to be handled by the same function. –  Karl Knechtel Jun 29 '11 at 2:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You can't.

Enum types are final by design.

The reason is that each enum type should have only the elements declared in the enum (as we can use them in a switch statement, for example), and this is not possible if you allow extending the type.

You might do something like this:

public interface MyInterface {
    // add all methods needed here
}

public enum A implements MyInterface {
    A, B;
    // implement the methods of MyInterface
}

public enum B implements MyInterface {
    C;
    // implement the methods of MyInterface
}

Note that it is not possible to do a switch with this interface, then. (Or in general have a switch with an object which could come from more than one enum).

share|improve this answer
    
If I can not, then what would be the best way to refactor it? –  user489041 Jun 28 '11 at 18:42
    
@user489051: See my latest edit. Hmm, it is the same what Peter posted. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 28 '11 at 18:46
    
Does this remove my ability thought to switch on the enum? I suppose I would be switching on an interface now –  user489041 Jun 28 '11 at 18:50
    
Yes, you can't do a switch(x) { case A: case B: case C: } if A, B and C are not defined in the same enum type. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 28 '11 at 19:06
1  
You can not. You can either have a single enum type (e.g. enum A { A, B, C; }), or multiple enum types, but for the latter one there is no switch statement. The switch statement requires that there is a finite number of elements, and this is contrary to you adding more enum values. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 28 '11 at 19:35

You can implement a common interface

interface I { }

enum A implements I {
   A, B
}
enum B implements I {
   C
}
public void functionA(I i) {
    //do something
}

obj.functionA(A.A);
obj.functionA(B.C);
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1  
Ahhh... yes, this is a good solution –  user489041 Jun 28 '11 at 18:44
1  
Does this remove my ability to switch on the enum? –  user489041 Jun 28 '11 at 18:51
    
Yes it does.... –  Robin Jun 28 '11 at 19:04
2  
@user489041, Instead of using a switch you can add a method to the interface doSomething() which you can call. Each method implements what you would put in the switch block. –  Peter Lawrey Jun 28 '11 at 20:13

You cannot make Enums extend other Enums but you can declare an interface which all your Enums can implment. The interface will have to include any methods you expect to invoke on your Enum values. Here is an example...

public class Question6511453 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(functionFoo(EnumA.FirstElem));
        System.out.println(functionFoo(EnumA.SecondElem));
        System.out.println(functionFoo(EnumB.ThirdElem));
    }

    private interface MyEnums {
        int ordinal();
    }

    private enum EnumA implements MyEnums {
        FirstElem,
        SecondElem
    }

    private enum EnumB implements MyEnums {
        ThirdElem
    }

    private static int functionFoo(MyEnums enumeration) {
        return enumeration.ordinal();
    }
}

The only problem with this solution is that it takes away your ability to use the Enum as you normally would like in switch statements because the ordinals and values may not be unique anymore.

This should answer your question but I doubt it will actually help you with your problem. :(

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You should add item C to your enum A. If it's something unrelated and adding it doesn't make sense, functionA() probably shouldn't be the one to handle it.

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