Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Until a few weeks ago I had never used git before in my life, or any version of source control for that matter. I started an internship and am now using it a great deal. I want to begin using it on my own, but there are a few things I am not sure about because where I'm interning already had everything set up. What I want to be able to do is setup a git repository on dropbox for a project that me and another are doing. My questions are below the code, code based off of this post

~/project $ git init  
~/project $ git add .
~/project $ git commit -m "first commit"
~/project $ cd ~/Dropbox/git

~/Dropbox/git $ mkdir project.git
~/Dropbox/git $ cd project.git
~/Dropbox/git $ git init --bare
~/Dropbox/git $ cd ~/project

~/project $ git remote add origin ~/Dropbox/git/project.git
~/project $ git push origin master

Q1. Is ~/project just going to be our eclipse android project folder?

Q2. How do we go about creating branches? Add a branch for each class we make then checkout that branch and use git add className.java? Then commit, merge with master, and push to orgin?

Q3. How do we clone from dropbox?

Sorry that some of these are very noobish. I'm just a rookie to the whole idea of source control!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Trust me, Git over Dropbox is a hell! Why don't just upload the git repository to a server? Github if it's not a private project, or Unfuddle otherwise. Answering Q1 and Q3 will make me sad because I know you will be doing it the wrong way XD

On the other hand, with regards to the Q2, if you are not a Git expert (neither your coworker), then don't care about branches (other than the master one). And yes, each time you create a class use git add, then git commit then git push... or:

git commit -am 'The message of the commit'
git push

When you are working with someone else in just one branch, then you should do this each time before starting to work: git pull. It will basically download and try to merge changes done by your coworker into your local source tree.

Also, if you are going to push something that could cause conflicts with your friend's modification... then Git will tell you about it and you must merge the changes (manually if it's a complex diff).

share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks Cristian. I will take your advice and use unfuddle. Would you mind pointing me to a good startup guide for unfuddle? Thanks again. –  user631063 Jun 28 '11 at 19:27
    
Oh and one more quick questions. If we aren't worrying about branches(besides master) How can we work on something at the same time? If he has master checked out, I wouldn't be able to check it out right? –  user631063 Jun 28 '11 at 19:47
    
I will edit my answer to cover that. –  Cristian Jun 28 '11 at 19:57
    
You don't even need to upload it to a server, that's the beauty of distributed version control. –  joey Jun 28 '11 at 21:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.