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I have this:

Foo
Id|BarId

Bar
Id

TableX
Id|FooId|BarId

TableY
Id|FooId|BarId

I need it to the case that if a query like

update Foo
set BarId = some bar id
where BarId = some other bar id

then it cascades to TableX and TableY. Is this possible using FK with on update cascade, or only manually defined triggers?

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Please elaborate on what is referencing what in this set of tables. –  Andriy M Jun 28 '11 at 19:45
    
What database engine do you use? Many databases (Oracle for one) do not have cascading updates on foreign keys. –  Justin Cave Jun 28 '11 at 20:18
1  
Why do TableX and TableY have FooID in them? Doesn't BarID already fully connote the FooID because of table Foo? Or can a single BarID be in multiple Foos? I wish you would use sensible example objects instead of meaningless ones. –  ErikE Jun 28 '11 at 20:35
    
@ErikE: Legacy, can't do anything about it. Thus the need for the cascading. I wish we had a more sensible schema, but this is it. –  FrankF Jun 29 '11 at 1:50
    
Frank, once you answer my question about whether BarID is unique in Foo I can offer you a more solid answer. –  ErikE Jun 29 '11 at 2:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, drop any foreign key constraints you have in TableX and TableY.

Then:

ALTER TABLE TableX
   ADD CONSTRAINT FK_TableX_FooId_BarID FOREIGN KEY (FooId, BarId)
   REFERENCES Foo (Id, BarId) ON UPDATE CASCADE;

-- Do the same for TableY

You didn't say what DBMS you're using (please do) but this will work for sure in SQL Server and probably in MySql. You must have an index or unique constraint (implicitly creating an index) on (Id, BarId) in table Foo before this foreign key reference will work.

You do NOT want to use individual foreign keys for each column as this will break the hierarchical multi-relationship that BarId has with FooId. If you update a particular BarId in Foo, you want it to update only those BarIds in TableX that are linked with that particular FooId, not all of them in the whole table. (That is, if I'm understanding you correctly).

I also can't resist offering that columns named Id should be taken out and shot in the head. Followed shortly by at least a solid whipping for their creators. :) Instead, name the PK of the Foo table FooId. As the database grows and queries become more and more complex involving more and more tables, not only is it annoying to be constantly aliasing columns (F.Id FooId) but it becomes it more and more likely you'll make a mistake and, say, accidentally put T.Id where you mean P.Id and the query will give you no errors since that column is in both tables.

In my understanding, the general consensus among database professionals is that columns should be named the same everywhere they're used, including in their source table.

I will additionally offer that if TableX and TableY are not referenced anywhere else then the artificial Id column in those could possibly come out in favor of another column that has business meaning. I don't know enough about the tables to really say, but many times extra artificial Ids are generated when they aren't needed (such as in many-to-many intermediate join tables, which should almost never have separate IDs).

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Thank you ErikE. Can you elaborate on your last aside? –  FrankF Jul 1 '11 at 13:53
    
@Frank updated. –  ErikE Jul 1 '11 at 19:36

if you specify On Update Cascade, the referenced values would be updated. Try that creation script

CREATE TABLE TableX(
  id INT, 
  FooId INT,
  BarId INT,
  INDEX foo_idx (FooId),
  INDEX bar_idx (BarId),
  FOREIGN KEY (FooId) 
    REFERENCES Foo(Id) 
    ON UPDATE CASCADE
  FOREIGN KEY (BarId) 
    REFERENCES Bar(Id) 
    ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=INNODB;
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