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I need some way to iterate over the range of addresses between two IPv6 addresses. i.e. if the first IP is 2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13e1 and the second one is 2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13f4, I would like to visit the 19 addresses in that range.

With IPv4 I just do inet_aton for string representation and get htonl of s_addr in the resulting struct, but how can I do that for IPv6?

For simplify:

struct in6_addr sn,en;
long i;

s="2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13e1";
e="2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13f4";

inet_pton(AF_INET6,s,&sn);
inet_pton(AF_INET6,e,&en);

[..]

for (i = _first_ipv6_representation; i<=_second_ipv6_representation; i++){
    /* stuck here */
}
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You have two questions in your question, they appear unrelated, and I am having trouble understanding exactly what you'd like to do. –  user7116 Jun 28 '11 at 19:42
    
Only one question: how to do "for" cycle iteration between 2 ipv6-addresses? –  AmiGO Jun 28 '11 at 19:53
    
As in you'd like to store both s and e in something you can loop over? Or do you want to compare the two addresses? –  user7116 Jun 28 '11 at 20:03
    
@sixlettervariables: yes, I'd like to store both s and e in something I can loop over –  AmiGO Jun 28 '11 at 20:38
    
just curious what you're using this for. This loop could run a long time depending on the input. ;-) –  Mike Jun 30 '11 at 3:15
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Old answer stricken per your comments, updated to iterate a range of addresses:

char output[64];
struct in6_addr sn, en;
int octet;

s="2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13e1";
e="2a03:6300:1:103:219:5bff:fe31:13f4";

inet_pton(AF_INET6,s,&sn);
inet_pton(AF_INET6,e,&en);

for ( ; ; ) {
    /* print the address */
    if (!inet_ntop(AF_INET6, &sn, output, sizeof(output))) {
        perror("inet_ntop");
        break;
    }

    printf("%s\n", output);

    /* break if we hit the last address or (sn > en) */
    if (memcmp(sn.s6_addr, en.s6_addr, 16) >= 0) break;

    /* increment sn, and move towards en */
    for (octet = 15; octet >= 0; --octet) {
        if (sn.s6_addr[octet] < 255) {
            sn.s6_addr[octet]++;
            break;
        } else sn.s6_addr[octet] = 0;
    }

    if (octet < 0) break; /* top of logical address range */
}
share|improve this answer
    
no, you don't understand, i need to iterate between all addresses in range (i.e. from first ip to second) –  AmiGO Jun 28 '11 at 21:27
    
@AmiGO: updated per your comments. –  user7116 Jun 28 '11 at 22:21
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It's tricky indeed (I like this question). Basically you need to increment and compare integers that are stored like this: uint8_t s6_addr[16].

  • Find a cool way to convert those arrays to 128b integers and work from that
  • Define two functions inc_s6 and cmp_s6 that increment / compare such arrays

Here is an attempt at inc_s6:

void inc_s6(uint8_t *addr)
{
        int i = 0;
        for (i = 15; i >= 0; i--) {
                if (++addr[i])
                    break;
        }
}

The compare function is a lot easier.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, I will try this –  AmiGO Jun 28 '11 at 20:39
1  
Since arithmetic in uint8_t is performed modulo 256, you can simply do if (++addr[i]) break; as the loop body. –  caf Jun 29 '11 at 3:37
    
@caf Right. I forgot that unsigned integer overflow is defined behavior. –  cnicutar Jun 29 '11 at 7:28
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For clarification:

I'm using that for some proxy-server that have a lot of binded IPv6 and to delegate new IP for each request.

My increment function with some additional explanation:

const char *s="2a03:6300:2:200:0:0:0:1"; // first ip in range

struct in6_addr sn;

inet_pton(AF_INET6,s,&sn);

static struct in6_addr cn = sn; //current ip in6_addr struct

unsigned int skipBits=126;
unsigned __int128 icn,skip; // works only with gcc

if (skipBits!=0){ // now we need to skip netmask bits to get next ip
    skip=pow(2,(128-skipBits))-2;
    u_int32_t swap;
    swap=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[3]);
    cn.s6_addr32[3]=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[0]);
    cn.s6_addr32[0]=swap;
    swap=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[2]);
    cn.s6_addr32[2]=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[1]);
    cn.s6_addr32[1]=swap;

    memcpy(&icn,&cn,sizeof icn);
    // increment, works very fast because gcc will compile it into sse2 intrinsic (double int64 operations)
    icn+=skip;
    memcpy(&cn,&icn,sizeof icn);

    swap=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[3]);
    cn.s6_addr32[3]=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[0]);
    cn.s6_addr32[0]=swap;
    swap=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[2]);
    cn.s6_addr32[2]=ntohl(cn.s6_addr32[1]);
    cn.s6_addr32[1]=swap;
}

I don't show compare function because @sixlettervariables solution works good enough.

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