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Is the following code clear and easy to read?

public void createDatabase() throws SQLException, IOException {
    SQLiteDatabase database = dbStore.getDatabase();
    LineNumberReader scriptInputReader = new LineNumberReader(new InputStreamReader(getClass().getResourceAsStream(SCRIPT_CREATE)));
    for(String line; (line = scriptInputReader.readLine()) != null;) {
        database.execSQL(line);
    }
}

I write a lot of "for" loops like the one above. For me it looks clear - it shows the temporary variable ("line") used in the loop, limits it's scope and points out when the loop ends (when "readLine" returns "null"). I wonder if other programmers will hate me for those...

or this one:

    SQLiteDatabase database = dbStore.getDatabase();
    Cursor cursor = database.query("PINS", new String [] {"ID", "X", "Y"}, null, null, null, null, "ID");
    if(cursor.moveToFirst()) {
        for(; !cursor.isAfterLast(); cursor.moveToNext()) {
            (...)
        }
    }
    cursor.close();

Are things like the above just "neat" or already a Java-puzzles?

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Given that I knew a programmer who used a for where most people would use an if I guess you can get away with it, but these examples really look like something to use a while loop on. –  fvu Jun 28 '11 at 21:20
    
@fvu: I'm pretty sure if I scored through the Java SDK I could find several "official" examples where a similar for heavy coding style was used. So that's quite subjective I think. –  Voo Jun 28 '11 at 21:32
    
I sometimes even write for(;;) { /*...*/ if(something) break; /*...*/ } But it's obviously wrong and I do it only while prototyping. It's like a habit to me ;) –  Chris Jun 28 '11 at 21:42
    
better hope the maintenance programmer isn't a psychopath who happens to know your address then :-) –  fvu Jun 28 '11 at 21:47
    
@fvu yeah.. WTF per minute ratio on for(;;) is usually very high.... –  Jarek Potiuk Jun 28 '11 at 22:13
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I like what you've done, but I would make one small change:

for(String line = scriptInputReader.readLine(); line != null; line = scriptInputReader.readLine()) {
    database.execSQL(line);
}

This separates the iteration action from the loop termination condition. Also, unlike the "while" version, it limits the scope of the line variable to the loop - narrowing scope as much as possible is good coding practice.

Also, code style checkers usually consider assignments nested within tests as "poor style". To be clear, your code is a bit like this:

for (int i = -1; ++i < max;) { // don't do this: increment action inside condition section
    // some code
}
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3  
Yeah I don't have a problem with only using for loops, but using assignments in conditions without reason is an evil, evil style. –  Voo Jun 28 '11 at 21:31
    
well, the rule for checking assignments in conditions is one of the first things I remove from checkstyle/PMD configuration - precisely because of this use case ;) –  Jarek Potiuk Jun 28 '11 at 22:45
1  
I like the idea of keeping the clear loop termination like "line!=null" and clear iteration action "readLine()". I think this looks better than my original loop. –  Chris Jul 2 '11 at 13:31
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I'd opt for:

String line = null;
while((line = scriptInputReader.readLine()) != null) {
  ... do stuff with line
}

This is clear and straightforward.

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The initializer to line setting it to null is spurious. –  Kirk Woll Jun 28 '11 at 21:32
    
Yes...but...this leaks a bit of memory since line is still assigned after the loop terminates. This also keeps the variable name in the scope after the loop - it may conflict with something else (different variable type) in the same method. And putting the whole thing in additional brackets seems extreme to me ;) –  Chris Jun 28 '11 at 21:36
    
@Kirk Woll -> True, i treat it more as a guide for the person reading it later that I have not forgotten to initialize it, like "Yes I intended to have a non initialized value here". –  Jarek Potiuk Jun 28 '11 at 21:37
    
@Chris -> Yeah.... extra brackets ... I never ever remember which is the sequence of = vs. != operators. ... I a bit rely on Eclipse with this (i have autosave action "remove unnecessary parenthesis" set to do it for me). Maybe a bit lame.... –  Jarek Potiuk Jun 28 '11 at 21:40
    
@Jarek -> I've meat the curly brackets to limit the scope of "line" variable: void foo() { { String line = null; while((line = scriptInputReader.readLine()) != null) { ... do stuff with line } } ... there is no line variable here anymore } –  Chris Jun 28 '11 at 22:08
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I would use a while loop

String line = scriptInputReader.readLine();
while(line != null){
     //do stuff
     line = scriptInputReader.readLine();
}
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I would feel more at ease with while.

The first one is not that bad as it is because it is easy to understand what the loop does, but if you add more logic in the middle of the loop and the operation is complicated it will become more difficult (because people will think:'hey, if he wanted just to read a file he would have used a while, so there must be some trick').

The second one (the for doing at the work, and no code inside the loop) is awful and probably in a not so distant future someone will say: 'Hey, there was a loop here and the contents were removed, but they forgot to remove the loop! I can optimize that by removing the for altogether').

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I think there are two different schools of thought here. The one as shown by Jarek Potiuk that prefers to use for/while loops for different purposes, ie. a for loop should be used when you know the range of your loop in advance (for (;i < arr.length(); i++)) while a while is preferred for unlimited situations.

But then there's the other line of thought that uses only one kind of loop and at that the for loop because it's more versatile. The Java SDK for example uses for loops pretty extensively in unlimited situations (eg linked lists). But then you should really write the for loop like Bohemian does - much clearer.

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Some prefer to use a while-loop when you do not know when the loop will terminate. For example reading through a file.

Jarek Potiuk's solution works, however I prefer something like this:

String line = scriptInputReader.readLine();
while(line != null) 
{
  ... do stuff with line
  line = scriptInputReader.readLine();
}

It is a little bit more code, but I have to agree with Bohemian:

code style checkers usually consider assignments nested within tests as "poor style"

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I am a great fan of code checkers. Really. I introduced them in my company for 25+ people. I love them. As long the code they promote is better.... We have reviewed recently the rules of checkstyle/PMD and removed a bunch of rules which caused more harm than good. assignment in condition was one of them. –  Jarek Potiuk Jun 28 '11 at 22:49
    
@Jarek yeap! and run them in svn hooks to deny all commits violating the code style guidelines, so that it will make a poor programmer's life miserable ;) pozdrawiam :) –  Chris Jul 2 '11 at 20:41
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