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I have just started learning ruby reading from different resources. One of them is rubylearning.com, and I was just reading the blocks section and doing the exercises. For some reason, this example's scope is working differently in my case:

x = 10  
5.times do |x|  
  puts "x inside the block: #{x}"  
end  

puts "x outside the block: #{x}"  

The output should be ( according to the site):

x inside the block: 0  
x inside the block: 1  
x inside the block: 2  
x inside the block: 3  
x inside the block: 4  
x outside the block: 10  

But my output is:

x inside the block: 0
x inside the block: 1
x inside the block: 2
x inside the block: 3
x inside the block: 4
x outside the block: 4

Any idea why? This section is supposed to be about the scope in ruby blocks, but I am totally confused now...

EDIT:

Ok I just realized something: I was executing my code from textmate. If i run it from the command line i get the expected result, plus 1.9.2 RUBY_VERSION. But I get 1.8.7 running it from Textmate. Has textmate its own version of ruby installed or something? – 0al0 0 secs ago edit

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What version of Ruby are you using? –  Dogbert Jun 28 '11 at 22:26
    
Ruby 1.9.2, according to ruby -v –  agente_secreto Jun 28 '11 at 22:27
    
are you sure about that? With Ruby 1.9.2 you should be getting the first (expected) result. (Ruby 1.8.x would output the second version) –  levinalex Jun 28 '11 at 22:33
1  
try "puts RUBY_VERSION" in your script –  levinalex Jun 28 '11 at 22:34
    
@levinalex I did what you said and I got 1.8.7. But i do get 1.9.2 using ruby -v... –  agente_secreto Jun 28 '11 at 22:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your example works since ruby 1.9.1 as the article explain:

In Ruby 1.9.1, blocks introduce their own scope for the block parameters only.

So you are working with another ruby version, try this:

ruby -v

I recommend to install rvm to manage different ruby versions.

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You are using an outdated version of Ruby. The scope of block local variables has changed in Ruby 1.9.0+.

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