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Very basic question, but I have an error in my code that can only be answered by one assumption: my class isn't being instantiated!

I haven't written much in Objective C in some time, and I was never really good, so please point out even the most painfully obvious.

I am using:

ObjectSelectionViewController *length = [[ObjectSelectionViewController alloc] initWithMeasureType:0];
ObjectSelectionViewController *mass = [[ObjectSelectionViewController alloc] initWithMeasureType:1];
ObjectSelectionViewController *volume = [[ObjectSelectionViewController alloc] initWithMeasureType:2];

NSLog(@"%@", [length measurementType]);
NSLog(@"%@", [mass measurementType]);
NSLog(@"%@", [volume measurementType]);

The NSLogs return whichever measurement was assigned last, regardless of the separate allocs and inits.

Here is the constructor of the ObjectSelectionViewController class:

#import "ObjectSelectionViewController.h"

@implementation ObjectSelectionViewController

NSString *measurementType;

-(ObjectSelectionViewController*) initWithMeasureType:(int)value
{
switch (value) {
    case 0: // Length
        measureType = @"Length";
        break;

    case 1: // Mass
        measureType = @"Mass";
        break;

    case 2: // Volume
        measureType = @"Volume";
        break;
}
return self;
}

-(NSString*) measurementType
{
return measureType;
}

Thanks for the help, it's driving me crazy!

share|improve this question
    
Nowhere in your custom init method you are actually allocating a new object. In your init method try if ((self = [super init])) { [YOUR CODE HERE] } return self; –  Rog Jun 28 '11 at 22:55
    
@Rog: init does not allocate new objects; that's what alloc is for. –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '11 at 22:57
    
You are setting a variable named measureType in your init... method, but you are calling a method named measurementType. Is this correct? –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '11 at 23:04
    
Yes Josh, the variable and the method both have the same name. I will update to show more of the code. –  Derek Jun 28 '11 at 23:16
    
No, the point of my comment was that they don't have the same name. The variable is measureType and the method is measure ment Type. –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '11 at 23:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You need to make measureType an instance variable, so that each object of this type that you create has its own copy:

@interface ObjectSelectionViewController : NSViewController {
    NSString * measureType;    // Declare an NSString instance variable
}

- (id) initWithMeasureType: (int)value;

@end

As it is, there is only one copy of the variable, and every time you instantiate a new object, its value changes. Since each instance is referring to the same copy, they all get the same value:

ObjectSelectionViewController *length = [[ObjectSelectionViewController alloc] initWithMeasureType:0];
NSLog(@"%@", [length measurementType]);     // Prints "Length"
ObjectSelectionViewController *mass = [[ObjectSelectionViewController alloc] initWithMeasureType:1];
NSLog(@"%@", [length measurementType]);    // Prints "Mass"

You also need to change your init... method as mentioned by other answerers:

- (id) initWithMeasureType: (int)value {

    // Call superclass's initializer
    self = [super init];
    if( !self ) return nil;

    switch (value) {
        case 0: // Length
            measureType = @"Length";
            break;

        case 1: // Mass
            measureType = @"Mass";
            break;

        case 2: // Volume
            measureType = @"Volume";
            break;
    }

    return self;
}

Since you are assigning a literal string to the instance variable, you do not need to worry about managing its memory; if you were doing anything more complicated, you would probably do well by declaring a property. Another note: initializer methods should always return id, a generic object pointer, to allow subclasses to work properly.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, thank you very much Josh. It was such a simple mistake, but without the experience of using Objective C a lot, I could have been here all night playing around with my constructor instead! –  Derek Jun 28 '11 at 23:36
    
You're welcome! Good luck. –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '11 at 23:38

You need to call [super init] first, like this:

-(id) initWithMeasureType:(int)value
{
    if ((self = [super init]))
    {
        switch (value) {
            case 0: // Length
                measureType = @"Length";
                break;

            case 1: // Mass
                measureType = @"Mass";
                break;

            case 2: // Volume
                measureType = @"Volume";
                break;
        }
    }
    return self;
}
share|improve this answer

Constructors are a convention in Objective-C rather than a language feature. So, for example, there's no automatic calling of parent constructors (just like you wouldn't expect any other overridden method to call its parent implementations). Similarly, the names used for constructors are just conventions, so the compiler knows nothing of init. With that in mind, what you actually want as your constructor is:

-(id) initWithMeasureType:(int)value
{
    if((self = [super init]))
    {
        switch (value) {
            case 0: // Length
                measureType = @"Length";
                break;

            case 1: // Mass
                measureType = @"Mass";
                break;

            case 2: // Volume
                measureType = @"Volume";
                break;
        }
    }
return self;
}

Assuming measureType is an instance variable (declared as part of the interface, generally speaking) and not a global then that should do what you want.

share|improve this answer
1  
Initializers should always return id in order to handle subclassing properly. –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '11 at 23:00
    
Thanks. I'm still getting the error so I assume the problem is that the variable is global. Where do you put instance variables? I'm currently sticking my variables in the .m file inside of the @implementation. –  Derek Jun 28 '11 at 23:04

In your custom init method you just need to start with:

self = [super init];
share|improve this answer
- (id) initWithMeasureType: (int)value {

// Call superclass's initializer
self = [super init];
if( !self ) return nil;

switch (value) {
    case 0: // Length
        measureType = @"Length";
        break;

    case 1: // Mass
        measureType = @"Mass";
        break;

    case 2: // Volume
        measureType = @"Volume";
        break;
}

return self;

}

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