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I've seen several assertions that C89 and C++03 define strict aliasing rules. I, however, cannot find that particular bit in the standard. My understanding was that strict aliasing rules were added in C99.

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I cited the entirety of C++03 3.10/15, which lists the valid forms of aliasing, in an answer to another question. –  James McNellis Jun 29 '11 at 1:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The C++03 standard has the following under §3.10 [basic.lval] p15:

If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through an lvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined48):
— the dynamic type of the object,
— a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
— a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the dynamic type of the object,
— a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a cv-qualified version of the dynamic type of the object,
— an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned types among its members (including, recursively, a member of a subaggregate or contained union),
— a type that is a (possibly cv-qualified) base class type of the dynamic type of the object,
— a char or unsigned char type.

Footnote:

48) The intent of this list is to specify those circumstances in which an object may or may not be aliased.

This site also lists the sections in the other standards.

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Checking this because I explicitly picked on your answer in the question. –  Billy ONeal Jun 29 '11 at 1:39

3.3 in C89, 3.10/15 in C++03.

Both have a footnote, words to the effect of, "the intent of this list is to indicate when an object may or may not be aliased".

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stupid ctrl-f! (I did search for the word "alias"! Honest!) –  Billy ONeal Jun 29 '11 at 1:21

This text is present in C89, §3.3 EXPRESSIONS:

An object shall have its stored value accessed only by an lvalue that has one of the following types:

  • the declared type of the object,

  • a qualified version of the declared type of the object,

  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the
    declared type of the object,

  • a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a
    qualified version of the declared type of the object,

  • an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned
    types among its members (including, recursively, a member of a
    subaggregate or contained union), or

  • a character type.

Violation of a "shall" constraint leads to undefined behaviour, so a set of allowed aliasing rules can be derived from this text.

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