Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int i, j;
    int *pi,*pj;
    pi=&i;
    pj=&j;

    printf("pi-pj=%d\n",pi-pj);
    return 0;
}

I tried this code on different compilers, but each time I am getting the same result, can anybody please help me understand why it is the same?

Ouput:

pi -pj = 3

I am confused, as the memory normally would be contiguously allocated. So, if let's say, our system stack is growing downwards and we have &i = 0xA, then the address of j(&j) = 0x6 (since integers are 4 bytes). Now as we are printing the difference between these two int pointer values, output should be "1". But it is coming as "3". Why is that?

share|improve this question
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! What output are you getting? What did you expect? If you're more precise about what this question is about, we can offer better feedback. Also, is this a homework question? If so, you should tag it as such. –  templatetypedef Jun 29 '11 at 2:56
1  
Getting the same result from different compilers is a problem. Damn! All my programs don't work correctly then. –  tjm Jun 29 '11 at 2:56
    
Sorry, for the inconvienience caused, i have edited my query, thanks for arguing on the problem description. –  Learner Jun 29 '11 at 14:11
1  
@Learner. Thanks for taking the time to improve your question. I don't think it's going to help much now though. A question that was closed 12 hours ago will have moved way down the pile and I doubt will get many views. I'm not sure what to advise as I'm not sure what the etiquette is for a post you want reopened, whether you should flag it with a message that says "I've tried to improve my question could it please be reopened" or something, or whether you should just start a new one and delete this one (if you can, if not ask a moderator to do it for you in the new question). –  tjm Jun 29 '11 at 15:11
2  
Please, tell us which compilers and flags you're using to test your program. Also check the correct output here. –  jweyrich Jun 29 '11 at 16:34
show 3 more comments

1 Answer 1

I was not able to replicate your experience. With gcc on Linux x86:

[wally@lenovotower ~]$ cat t.c
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int i, j;
    int *pi,*pj;
    pi=&i;
    pj=&j;

    printf("pi-pj=%d\n",pi-pj);
    return 0;
}

[wally@lenovotower ~]$ gcc -o t t.c
[wally@lenovotower ~]$ ./t
pi-pj=1
[wally@lenovotower ~]$ 

This means that i and j are adjacent. Pointer subtraction returns the number of items between the pointers, not the address difference. To get your result, there would have to be two items-worth of padding in between. I can't explain how that could be.

share|improve this answer
1  
MSVC with no optimisation returns 3: the two items-worth of padding are pi and pj. With optimisation I get -1, i.e. it's arranged i and j the other way around. –  Rup Jun 29 '11 at 17:04
    
i tried the compilation on Microsoft Visual studio 2010...n output was coming as 3, @Rup, can u plz, let me know, how the compiler optimization is changing the output. –  Learner Jun 30 '11 at 0:43
    
I assume it's because it doesn't need to store p1 and p2 - it just computes them and subtracts them without ever committing them to memory - and so doesn't allocate any space for them on the stack. –  Rup Jun 30 '11 at 8:55
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.