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How could I refactor the method

private void ListenToPropertyChangedEvent(INotifyPropertyChanged source,
                                          string propertyName)
{
    source.PropertyChanged += (o, e) =>
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == propertyName)
            MyMagicMethod();
    };
}

if I wished to avoid using the anonymous method here?

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The trick here is not the anonymous method -- it is the closure that is used. The only other way that comes to mind is creating a new object which implements a PropertyName variable/property or similar as well as an OnPropertyChanged event handler and wiring that up and ... ick. –  user166390 Jun 29 '11 at 6:33
    
@pst: Thanks for the comment. I guess I am still a little fuzzy about the internals here. Reading csharpindepth.com/Articles/Chapter5/Closures.aspx now. =) –  Jens Jun 29 '11 at 6:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Implement the closure that is implicitly created by the lambda explicitly:

private void ListenToPropertyChangedEvent(INotifyPropertyChanged source,
                                          string propertyName)
{
    var listener = new MyPropertyChangedListener(propertyName);
    source.PropertyChanged += listener.Handle;
}

class MyPropertyChangedListener
{
    private readonly string propertyName;

    public MyPropertyChangedListener(string propertyName)
    {
        this.propertyName = propertyName;
    }

    public void Handle(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == this.propertyName)
        {
            // do something
        }
    }
}
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Thanks! This is what my lambda above really means internally? Interesting. =) –  Jens Jun 29 '11 at 7:15

You can handle this by having a single event handler for all instances that uses a dictionary of instances that you are following:

private Dictionary<INotifyPropertyChanged, List<string>> sourceMap =
    new Dictionary<INotifyPropertyChanged, List<string>>();

private void ListenToPropertyChangedEvent(INotifyPropertyChanged source,
                                            string propertyName)
{
    if (sourceMap.ContainsKey(source))
        sourceMap[source].Add(propertyName);
    else
    {
        source.PropertyChanged += source_PropertyChanged;
        sourceMap[source] = new List<string> { propertyName };
    }
}

void source_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    var source = sender as INotifyPropertyChanged;
    var list = sourceMap[source];
    if (list.Contains(e.PropertyName))
        MyMagicMethod();
}

This version doesn't have any error checking or removal but it demonstrates the technique. It is particularly valuable if you listen for multiple properties from the same source. This is because it only adds a single handler to the PropertyChanged event per instance.

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Thanks for your answer! Indeed I might listen for multiple properties from the same source. There may be a little more bookkeeping involved with this approach, since I don't want to keep the sources from being garbage collected by being referenced in the dictionary, but that can be managed. –  Jens Jun 29 '11 at 7:14

I'm not sure exactly what youre trying to achieve or why you dont want to use anonymous methods, but you could do something more generic:

    private PropertyChangedEventHandler GetHandler
      (Func<PropertyChangedEventArgs, bool> test, Action toInvoke)
    {
        return new PropertyChangedEventHandler(
            (o, e) => 
            {
               if (test(e))
                toInvoke(); 
            }); 
    }

Then you can use it like so:

  source.PropertyChanged += GetHandler                
            (
                p => p.PropertyName == propertyName, MyMagicMethod
            ); 

That way your if test and the target method group can be swapped about easily. Your event handler is also strongly typed rather than anonymous.

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My co-workers are not comfortable with anonymous methods, so I try to avoid them whenever possible. –  Jens Jun 29 '11 at 7:16
    
Technically a PropertyChangedEventHandler is a delegate specifically intended for listening to events that propagate PropertyChangedEventArgs, so anytime you use a strongly-typed EventHandler such as that you are avoiding the use of an anonymous method, provided that you just pass in a method group, which is a function (minus parentheses, bc you arent invoking it immediately) you want to call when the event fires. I wouldn't say its necessary to create an entirely new class that encapsulates event listening - thats what an EventHandler already does. –  Sean Thoman Jun 29 '11 at 7:22

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