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public void startReportGeneration() {
        Thread thread = new Thread(this);
        thread.setDaemon(true);
        thread.start();

        try {

            try {
                waitSec = 10000;



            }
            thread.join(waitSec );

    if(thread.isAlive())
            {
                setReportDataBytes(null);

            }
            thread=null;
        } catch (InterruptedException iEx) {

        }


    }

Hi ,

I have a Report Generation task , so for this i am starting a Thread . The Report generation should take only 10000 Ms , or otherwise the Action should be terminated .

I have coded this way , please tell me whether i can use join in this case ??

Thread thread = new Thread(this);
        thread.setDaemon(true);
        thread.start();


            thread.join(waitSec );
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Jarrod Roberson, Chris Gerken, Jefffrey, Dharmendra, user97693321 Nov 28 '12 at 3:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    

1 Answer 1

There's a java framework in the JDK for this kind of stuff; in the java.util.concurrent package.

Google it up, but you probably want to use an ExecutorService and submit a task, from which you can get() the result specifying a timeout. All the heavy lifting is done for you by the classes there.

Here's a simple example you can follow:

import java.util.concurrent.*;

public static void main(String[] args) 
{
    ExecutorService service = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Future<String> task = service.submit(new Callable<String> () {
        public String call() throws Exception
        {
            // Put your "do it" code here. This will run in another thread.
            return "hello world";
        }});
    try
    {
        // The Future#get() method gives you the result of the call() method that ran/will run in another thread. 
        // It's a blocking call, meaning it will wait in necessary until the other thread finishes.
        // You may also specify a maximum time for the call() method to complete
        String taskResult = task.get(10, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
        // Do something with the result
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e)
    {
        // Thread got interrupted. Can happen
    }
    catch (ExecutionException e)
    {
        // Your call() method exploded
    }
    catch (TimeoutException e)
    {
        // Your call() method timed out
        task.cancel(); // recommended you always do this when timeout
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd recommend calling task.cancel() in the TimeoutException catch clause. When doing that you also need to handle the interrupt in your task. –  Andreas Holstenson Jun 29 '11 at 20:07
    
@Andreas - good idea. I've incorporated your suggestion. Thanks. –  Bohemian Jun 30 '11 at 1:45
    
+1 but you'll need to make sure your task responds to the cancel request (ie implement a decent interruption policy) –  Toby Jul 1 '11 at 10:49

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