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I appreciate there are many posts on this, and much on google, but I'm struggling to understand how to break up a JSON stream, and access the data.

I have a simple JSON response:

{ "type": "FeatureCollection",
"features": [
{ "type": "Feature",
"geometry": {"type": "Point", "coordinates": [-122.4211908, 37.7564513]},
"properties": {
"id": "2950648771574984913",
"accuracyInMeters": 80,
"timeStamp": 1309323032,
"reverseGeocode": "San Francisco, CA, USA",
"photoUrl": "https://www.google.com/latitude/apps/badge/api?type=photo&photo=uuRL2jABAAA.9fWeRzNpS-tdX0cqHxxclg.7zdBNW-Rb634EIkOgyO8sw",
"photoWidth": 96,
"photoHeight": 96,
"placardUrl": "https://www.google.com/latitude/apps/badge/api?type=photo_placard&photo=uuRL2jABAAA.9fWeRzNpS-tdX0cqHxxclg.7zdBNW-Rb634EIkOgyO8sw&moving=true&stale=true&lod=1&format=png",
"placardWidth": 56,
"placardHeight": 59
}
}
]
}

I'm trying to get access to all of the data in it, such as:

The two coordinates. The reverseGeocode. etc.

I've built a function like this:

    function findTristan(){
            var FindUrl = "/proxy.php";

            var tristanData = $.getJSON(FindUrl,function(json){});

            // this is the part I have failed to get right.
            alert(tristanData.coordinates);

    }
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What is your question? –  Flimzy Jun 29 '11 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Due to the asynchronous nature of AJAX you need to manipulate the data only inside the success callback as that's the only place where this data is available. The $.getJSON function returns immediately and it doesn't return the result of the AJAX request. So the anonymous callback you left empty in your code should be used:

function findTristan() {
    var FindUrl = '/proxy.php';
    $.getJSON(FindUrl, function(json) {
        var lat = json.features[0].geometry.coordinates[0];
        var lon = json.features[0].geometry.coordinates[1];
        alert('lat: ' + lat + ', lon: ' + lon);
    });
}
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Thats a really helpful example, thank you for taking the time to make it so clear. –  Tristan Brotherton Jun 29 '11 at 8:04
    
What would the syntax be for accessing the data in the properties section of the JSON, such as the reverseGeocode? –  Tristan Brotherton Jun 29 '11 at 8:24
    
@Tristan, you may try this: json.features[0].properties.reverseGeocode. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 29 '11 at 9:01

You need to use the $.parseJSON function to transform your JSON into a js array : http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.parseJSON/

Regards,

Max

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I don't think you need this. If the server sends proper content type header (Content-Type: application/json) along with the JSON data, jQuery automatically parses it. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 29 '11 at 7:59
    
i didn't know jquery was that good. thanks for the tip ! –  JMax Jun 29 '11 at 8:12

These two should be used in your getJSON complete function.

json.features[0].geometry.coordinates[0]
json.features[0].geometry.coordinates[1]

You shouldn't just alert after you issue an Ajax request. Why? Because Ajax call is asynchronous by nature. That simply means that request is send out and your code immediately continues its execution without waiting for the request to get a response. That's why your alert is executed (without any results of course) before you get results back from the server.

And also getJSON will not return data the way that you've done it. It will return data in its complete function where you'll have to consume it yourself.

function findTristan(){
    var FindUrl = "/proxy.php";

    var tristanCoords = {};

    $.getJSON(FindUrl, function(data){

        tristanCoords = data.features[0].geometry.coordinates;
        alert("x: " + tristanCoords[0] + ", y: " + tristanCoords[1]);

    });
}

Advice

Whenever you have to work with javascript, objects etc. use Firebug (Firefox plugin) and debug your code. You'll be ablle to drill down your object and exactly see its structure.

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