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I have a WSDL (portion show below), from which I am trying to retrieve the names of all string elements using a regular expression.

<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCurrDpId" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCustomerCapable" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appDateReceivedSys" type="xs:date" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appDecision" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appPriority" type="xs:int"/>
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCountry" type="xs:string" />

So I have a regex that matches the lines on which only the string elements occur:

name="(.*?)"\s?type="xs:string

But I am only interested in the portion enclosed by the first set of brackets (a group, right?), i.e. in the name attribute.

UPDATE:

The answers below have exposed a flaw in my understanding: I thought that being able to return a portion of a regular expression (as determined by a group) is a feature of a regular expression, which obviously it is not. It is more of a "side-effect", and one that requires more complex processing. In my case, I was hoping to be able to do this in my text editor (Sublime Text), because of the nifty ability to highlight and select all search results. Anyway, thanks for the answers.

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2  
Which language are you using? –  Tim Jun 29 '11 at 8:06
1  
Just as suggestion: For handling XML-files, you should always use XML-Parser. For example, whats about <xs:element type="xs:string" minOccurs="0" name="appCountry" />? –  KingCrunch Jun 29 '11 at 8:07
1  
@King: There's no problem with using regex if this is a one-off parsing of a file where the format is known. –  Tim Jun 29 '11 at 8:08
    
The answers have pointed out a flaw in my understanding: I thought that getting a portion of the match back is something you can specify in the search string, but obviously not. The resulting match is a complex object and the interpretation thereof is language dependent, apparently. –  mydoghasworms Jun 29 '11 at 14:28
    
@KingCrunch: Tim is right, this is more of a once-off requirement, and I thought a regex would do the trick. I did look for some command-line xpath tools, and came across 4xpath (python) and xpath (perl), but nothing C-based (yet). Next time around, that might be an option. –  mydoghasworms Jun 30 '11 at 4:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you don't say which language you're using, here a way to do it in perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl 
use strict;
use warnings;

while(<DATA>) {
    print $1,"\n" if /name="(.*?)"\s*type="xs:string/;
}

__DATA__
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCurrDpId" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCustomerCapable" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appDateReceivedSys" type="xs:date" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appDecision" type="xs:string" />
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appPriority" type="xs:int"/>
<xs:element minOccurs="0" name="appCountry" type="xs:string" />

output:

appCurrDpId
appCustomerCapable
appDecision
appCountry
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Thanks for both answers. Unfortunately I could pick only one. As explained in my comment on my question, I thought that getting a portion of the match back is something you can specify in the regex itself, but obviously not. –  mydoghasworms Jun 29 '11 at 14:29

If you put brackets around the stuff you want, you can refer to it in your replace as $1, $2 etc for the 1st, 2nd bracketed group etc. Here's how you would do it in java:

String name = line.replaceAll("^.*name=\"(.*?)\"\\s?type=\"xs:string\".*$", "$1");
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Thanks for the answer. It was difficult to choose between yours and M42's. –  mydoghasworms Jun 30 '11 at 4:55

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