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This is (roughly) what I have:

class A
{
    public bool IsInUpdate = false;
    public void Update()
    {
        IsInUpdate = true;

        //(...do stuff...)

        IsInUpdate = false;
    }
}

class B
{
    A a_inst;
    System.Threading.Thread physicsThread = null;

        void Draw()
        {
            physicsThread = new System.Threading.Thread(a_inst.Update);
            physicsThread.Start();
        }


    void Update()
    {
        while(physicsThread.IsAlive)
        {
            // Right here there can be cases where physicsThread.IsAlive is true but IsInUpdate is false, how does that happen?
        }

        (...do stuff...)
    }


}

Question is in the comments of the code. Basically the physics thread instance says it's alive but the function it's calling has clearly been finished calling (as can be seen by the bool being set to false).

Any ideas why this happens? All I want to do is make sure the update function in class B does not execute until the threaded update function of class A has executed...

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2  
I tried to edit your post to format the code, but it doesn't currently make sense, because you're trying to declare Draw() within the Update() method. Please tidy up your post and formatting. –  Jon Skeet Jun 29 '11 at 8:54
    
sorry I just noticed that and fixed it, draw and update are seperate functions. –  soshiki Jun 29 '11 at 8:57
    
Assuming a_inst gets filled somewhere, right before the thread has started and after it has finished a_inst.IsInUpdate will be false in the while. What is the real problem here? –  Marino Šimić Jun 29 '11 at 8:59
1  
btw, a tight loop on IsAlive is a very bad way to wait... especially against a field (which can get register-cached). Personally, I'd just use a lock here - job done –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '11 at 9:02
1  
@meds I'll update my answer to show –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '11 at 9:07
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since IsInUpdate is simply a public field (and non-volatile at that), there are no guarantees about what you see; the normal sensible rules about what you see only apply on a single thread, and you have not guarded any of this data. There is also an edge-case around the start condition, but personally I would be using either lock (if you need to wait for it to complete), or maybe Interlocked if you just need to know if it is active.

For example:

class A
{
    private readonly object syncLock = new object();
    public object SyncLock { get { return syncLock; } }
    public void Update()
    {
        lock(SyncLock)
        {

            //(...do stuff...)

        }
    }
}

and

void Update()
{
    lock(a_inst.SyncLock)
    {
        (...do stuff...)
    }
}

With the above, you are guaranteed that only one thread will have the lock at any time, so if you get to "do stuff" you know that it isn't also running the other Update(). If you need to wait etc there are also Wait() / Pulse() methods against locks, or you can use gates such as ManualResetEvent/AutoResetEvent.

Things like lock also ensure correct memory barriers between the threads, so you see the correct data.

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Oh ok, I think I understand now but just to clarify: What the lock command does is it ties down the object and prevents its execution by any other threads, in the event another thread has the object locked it waits for it to be free before allowing the body of code inside it to execute? –  soshiki Jun 29 '11 at 9:25
    
@meds - as long as by "the object" you mean the one in SyncLock, yes. Note that the other threads must also use lock for this to work - nothing is automatically locked. But yes, to get inside the lock statement you know you have an exclusive take on that lock –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '11 at 9:29
    
So if 5 threads locked the same SyncLock object it means they would each have to wait until the other threads were done before being allowed to execute passed the lock function? If so are the locks given linearly, i.e. first come first serve and standing in line sort of thing or is it random? –  soshiki Jun 29 '11 at 9:40
    
@meds yes, all 5 callers must use lock for this to work - any not using lock will simply walk in unimpeeded; re the order; you'd have to check the docs on that; I suspect linearly, but I can't see it stated. It refers to a ready queue, but that's about it –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '11 at 9:49
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This situation can happen when the Update function has not been called yet. Just because you have called Start on the thread doesn't mean it's immediately going to execute it's main function. I'm not 100% sure if there is a slight window of opportunity where the thread is still alive but the main function has finished executing.

Basically you want to have a look at ManualResetEvent or AutoResetEvent to signal that your thread has finished working. Alternatively an event you can raise after Update() has finished and B can subscribe to might be good enough. Like this:

class A
{
    public event EventHandler UpdateFinished;

    public void Update()
    {
          ... do work

        var handler = UpdateFinished;
        if (handler != null)
        {
             handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}

class B
{
    public void Draw()
    {
        a_inst.UpdateFinished += HandleUpdateFinished;
        ... start your thread
    }

    private void HandleUpdateFinished(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
         ... do whatever
    }
}
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