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How can I make a true splash screen in Android? I don't want timers or delays. Just a splash screen that is shown until your application has loaded.

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Could check out: blog.blundell-apps.com/tut-splashscreen-with-progress-bar –  Blundell Jun 21 '12 at 12:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like

public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState){
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.splash);

    handler = new Handler();

    new AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void>() {

    @Override
    protected Void doInBackground(Void... params) {
            //Do some heavy stuff
            return null;
        } 

        @Override
        public void onPostExecute(Void result){
            handler.post(new Runnable(){
                 @Override
                 public void run(){
                     setContentView(R.layout.main);
                 }
            });
        }
   }.execute();
}
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1  
What if the heavy stuff is precisely setContentView(R.layout.main)? –  slipbull Sep 12 '11 at 17:31
1  
you should never call setContentView on an activity twice. I would suggest instead of setContentView calling startActivity(the activity you want to load after splash). –  jsb May 31 '12 at 19:28
    
this doesn't work for me. The screen sticks to the first splash, and doesn't set to the second load screen. I used almost the same code except I don't have the @Override tag on the run method because eclipse removed it as a quickFix saying: The method run() of type new Runnable(){} must override a superclass method –  Ninjack Jun 6 '12 at 8:03
    
what actually starts the AsyncTask? –  Ninjack Jun 6 '12 at 9:05
    
I've added .execute() to the code, must have gone wrong while copy paste-ing :) –  Niek Haarman Jun 6 '12 at 11:19

A solution, with code, appears below which seems to have worked flawlessly on a number of test devices for the past six weeks.

However, there are a few preliminaries that should be considered before plunging into a full splash screen.

First of all, if you can avoid the need for a splash screen by bringing up your app's main view immediately, giving the user immediate access to your app, that is your very best option.

You can often accomplish this by immediately bringing up the graphics of your main display, and then creating a worker thread to do any time-consuming initialization tasks, such as loading a table that is always used by the app.

However, it may be that the graphics of your main view themselves take a long time to set up and display, and you want something else to be seen during that initialization.

Now, if your main activity has a simple (e.g., default), light or black, non-transparent background, that will provide immediate confirmation that at least something is occurring when the user launches your app. Background themes that I have personally found to work as primitive "splash" displays include the following (to be added to the activity tag of your main activity in your manifest file):

android:theme="@style/Theme.Light.NoTitleBar"
android:theme="@style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar"

I would note in this regard that if your activity background requires any kind of bitmap, or animation, or other drawable beyond a default theme (or a simple light or black theme as shown above), my experience is that the activity background will not display until your main view has displayed anyway, and so merely changing the background of your activity to itself be your splash display does not (in my experience) accomplish a more immediate response than your main screen already provides.

Although the above simple themes will work as primitive "splashes," maybe you think that a simple light or black activity background is too nondescript a cue that your app has launched, and you want something that shows the name or logo of your app while the user is waiting. Or, maybe your activity background must be transparent, because you want to be able to overlay some other app with your own app's views (such a transparent background is, of course, invisible during startup, and so will not cue the user that your app has been started).

If, after considering all of the alternatives presented above, you still think that you need a splash screen, here is an approach that I have personally found to work very well.

For this approach, you will need to define a new class that extends LinearLayout. The reason you need your own class is because you need to receive positive confirmation that your splash screen has actually displayed, so you can immediately move on to displaying your main view without some kludge of a timer that can only guess at how long it will take your splash screen to appear. I would note in this regard that if you start the display of your main view too quickly after displaying your splash view, the splash view will never be seen; using this approach avoids that possibility.

Here is an example of such a class:

public class SplashView extends LinearLayout {

    public interface SplashEvents {
        //This event is signaled after the splash and all of its child views, 
        // if any, have been drawn.
        // As currently implemented, it will trigger BEFORE any scrollbars are drawn.
        // We are assuming that there will BE no scrollbars on a SplashView.
        public void onSplashDrawComplete();
    }

    private SplashEvents splashEventHandler = null;

    public void setSplashEventHandler(SplashEvents splashEventHandler) {
        this.splashEventHandler = splashEventHandler;
    }

    private void fireSplashDrawCompleteEvent() {
        if(this.splashEventHandler != null) {
            this.splashEventHandler.onSplashDrawComplete();
        }
    }

    public SplashView(Context context) {
        super(context);

        //This is set by default for a LinearLayout, but just making sure!
        this.setWillNotDraw(true);

        //If the cache is not enabled, then I think that helps to ensure that
        // dispatchDraw override WILL
        // get called.  Because if caching were enabled, then the 
        //drawing might not occur.
        this.setDrawingCacheEnabled(false);

        setGravity(Gravity.CENTER);

        //This splices in your XML definition (see below) to the SplashView layout
        LayoutInflater.from(context).inflate(R.layout.splashscreen, this, true);
    }


    @Override
    protected void dispatchDraw(Canvas canvas) {
        //Draw any child views
        super.dispatchDraw(canvas);

        //Signal client objects (in this case, your main activity) that 
            // we have finished initializing and drawing the view.
        fireSplashDrawCompleteEvent();
    }
}

Because we are loading our XML from inside the view, we need to define it in XML using a <merge> tag to "splice" in the XML-defined elements as children of our SplashView class. Here is an example (to be placed in your app's res/layout folder), which you can tailor to your own needs:

<merge xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:gravity="center_horizontal"
    >
    <TextView  android:id="@+id/tvHeading"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent" 
        android:layout_height="fill_parent"
        android:gravity="center"
        android:textSize="30dp"
        android:textStyle="bold"
        android:text="Loading..."
        android:layout_weight="1.0"
        android:textColor="#00ff00"
        android:background="#AA000000"
        />
</merge>

Note that the TextView is defined with a translucent black background, so that it will cause a dimming of the launcher display, with the text "Loading..." superimposed on top in green.

All that remains is to edit something like the following into (and above) the onCreate() method of your main activity:

private Handler uiThreadHandler = new Handler();

@Override
public void onCreate(final Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    //Create an instance of the splash view, and perform a setContentView()
    SplashView splashView = new SplashView(this);

    //Doing this allows you to access the "this" pointer of the main 
        // activity inside the Runnable below.
    final main mainThis = this;

    // Set an event handler on the SplashView object, so that as soon 
    // as it completes drawing we are
    // informed.  In response to that cue, we will *then* put up the main view, 
    // replacing the content view of the main activity with that main view.
    splashView.setSplashEventHandler(new SplashView.SplashEvents() {
        @Override
        public void onSplashDrawComplete() {
            //Post the runnable that will put up the main view
            uiThreadHandler.post(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                    public void run() {
                        //This method is where you will have moved 
                        // the entire initialization of your app's 
                        // main display, which normally would have been 
                        // in your onCreate() method prior to adding the 
                        // splash display.
                        launchMainView(mainThis, savedInstanceState);
                    }
            });
        }
    });

    //This will cause your splash view to draw.  When it finishes, it will trigger the code above.
    this.setContentView(splashView);

    //At this point, do *not* move directly on to performing a setContentView() on your main view.
    // If you do, you will never see the splash view at all.
    // You simply wait for the splash view to signal you that it has completed drawing itself, and
    // *then* call launchMainView(), which will itself call setContentView() again, passing it
    // your main view.
}

//Here is a stripped-down version of launchMainView().  You will typically have some additional
// initializations here - whatever might have been present originally in your onCreate() method.
public void launchMainView(main mainThis, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    myRootView = new MyRootView(mainThis);

    setContentView(myRootView);
}

The above approach is working very well for me. I have used it targeting API level 8 only, and have tested that code on various devices, including both phones and tablets, running Android 2.2.1, 2.3.3 and 4.0.1 (ICS).

Caveat:

The potential liability of the above approach is the possibility that, for some combination of circumstances, the splash view might not signal that it has completed, and the splash would therefore get "stuck" on the main display, with no main view to replace it. That has never happened to me, but I'd like to solicit comments here regarding whether the override of dispatchDraw() in the SplashView above might ever not get called. I performed a visual inspection of the code that triggers dispatchDraw(), and it looks to me as if it will always get called, given the initializations I've done in the SplashView constructor.

If someone has a better method to override for that same purpose, I'd appreciate hearing about it. I was surprised that I was not able to find any override specifically tailored to fire when a view had finished displaying, and so, if one exists and I somehow missed it, please post a comment about that below. Comments affirming that this approach will work are also very welcome!

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1  
Works great for me, I like your solution, hopefully there will be no bugs in future. Thank you! –  idish Aug 30 '13 at 2:43
    
Likewise, I've had no problems using this approach in multiple apps, testing on devices from Froyo to Jelly Bean myself, with public distribution for many months and no complaints. –  Carl Sep 3 '13 at 22:35
    
Why not using "onDraw" instead, and call your function there only once (use a flag to protect it from being called more than once). –  android developer Dec 8 '13 at 11:00
    
The child views of the splash view are drawn after the splash view's own onDraw() method is invoked in order to appear in front of it, so firing onSplashDrawComplete() from onDraw() would start the main view's display prior to the display of any child views of the splash view, and thus the splash would not become visible prior to the main view appearing. The dispatchDraw() method draws all of the child views of the splash view, and so by overriding that and calling super.dispatchDraw() before firing the event, we can ensure that the child views get drawn prior to launching the main view. –  Carl Dec 8 '13 at 11:53
1  
+1 for giving the user immediate access to your app, that is your very best option. Totally agreed (as an engineer maybe?) –  Suzi Nov 5 '14 at 2:18
public class MyLocationListener extends Activity {

    public Handler myHandler = new Handler(){
             public void handlerMessage(Message msg){
                  set you contentView here after splash screen
             }
          } 

    public MyLocationListener(Context context){
        this.context = context;
    }
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
                super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
                 setContentView(R.layout.splashscreen);
                // don't set Content View here instead start a thread here to do the task yiou want to do. 
                // Now post message from new thread to UI Thread using handlers.

         }

}
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Its not that hard; you just create a view which you will use as your splashscreen (one that has simple layout and not requires lots of measuring), set that as the content for the activity using setContentView;

Then call setContentView on the activity again with the complex layout which takes a while to build. You can even use Asynctask to load data before you call setContent the second time with your complex layout. That depends on wether you are bound by data loading or view building.

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If setContentView() is invoked to display the splash view, and then immediately invoked again for the main view, the splash view will not have a chance to display prior to the second view being displayed. Now, if you have a worker thread doing heavy stuff after the splash is displayed, and have that thread post to the UI handler to perform the final setContentView(), that should work, so long as the async stuff takes a while. But if your delay is from the main view itself (per slipbull's comment) then you need to wait until the splash draws before triggering the 2nd setContentView(). –  Carl Apr 11 '12 at 13:21

The best way to do a splash screen is:

  1. if the user press back, you need to go fast to the main screen.
  2. no animation.

I arrived in this good solution:

import android.app.Activity; import android.content.Intent; import android.os.AsyncTask; import android.os.Bundle; import android.view.WindowManager; import br.eti.fml.android.sigame.R;

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean;

public class LauncherActivity extends Activity {
    private AsyncTask goingToNextScreen;
    private AtomicBoolean alreadyShown = new AtomicBoolean(false);

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        setContentView(R.layout.launcher);
        getWindow().addFlags(WindowManager.LayoutParams.FLAG_KEEP_SCREEN_ON);

        //noinspection unchecked
        goingToNextScreen = new AsyncTask() {

            @Override
            protected Object doInBackground(Object... objects) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1500);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // ignores
                }

                return null;
            }

            @Override
            protected void onPostExecute(Object o) {
                goNext();
            }
        }.execute();
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
        if (goingToNextScreen != null) {
            goingToNextScreen.cancel(true);

            goNext();
        }
    }

    private void goNext() {
        if (alreadyShown.compareAndSet(false, true)) {
            startActivity(new Intent(LauncherActivity.this, HomeActivity.class));
            overridePendingTransition(0, 0);
            finish();
            overridePendingTransition(0, 0);
        }
    } }
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Sometime, using splash, the app need a few milliseconds or second to load the content of the Activity.

If you only want a "backgorund image" as usual splash screen. I think the best way is using Themes.

Using SherlockActionBar for example:

<style name="SplashTheme" parent="Theme.Sherlock.NoActionBar">
    ...
    <item name="android:windowBackground">@drawable/splash</item>
    ...
</style>

where splash can be a .9 file to fill the screen.

And the the Activity in the Manifest must be something like

    <activity
        android:name=".SplashActivity"
        ...
        android:theme="@style/SplashTheme"
        ...>
        ...
     </activity>

then you don't need the setContent(View) line in your code. And the Theme will be loaded faster than the content.

This allows you to have a splash screen from the beginning of the load of the app. Without black windows or actionBars or something like that.

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//code for Splash code

public class SplashScreen extends Activity {

    static int SPLASH_TIMEOUT = 5000;

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.splash_layout);

    new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            startActivity(new Intent(SplashScreen.this, MainActivity.class));
            finish();
        }
    }, SPLASH_TIMEOUT);
    }
}

Here SPLASH_TIMEOUT will define after howmuchtime your own activity should display,so change this value according to your need.

//code for MainActivity.class

public class MainActivity extends ActionBarActivity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

    }

}
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OP states he doesnt want timers or delays. Read the question. –  stealthjong Jul 25 '14 at 9:01

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