Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have these delegate method for a tableview inside a class:

- (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
return 1;
}

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {

return [array1 count];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {


static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

UITableViewCell *cell = (UITableViewCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if(cell == nil){
    cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc]initWithStyle:UITableViewStylePlain reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease] ; 
}

cell.textLabel.text = [array1 objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

return cell;
}

if I have a single tableview it's ok but if I have two tableview? How Can I organize my code? with tag?

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

See how all the delegate methods have a tableView:(UITableView *)tableView in them?

You can define your table views in the header file and then just simply go: (assuming your table is called myTable)

if (tableView == myTable)

Then you can have as many table views as you like.

So for example:

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {

return [array1 count];
}

Becomes:

- (NSInteger)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView numberOfRowsInSection:(NSInteger)section {
    if (tableView == myTable)
    {
       return [array1 count];
    }
    if (tableView == myTable2)
    {
       return [array2 count];
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

My suggestion is having your data source act as a table view delegate, instead of your controller.

This is a design more closer to the Model-View-Controller pattern and will allow you much more flexibility and avoid checking for the specific value that the tableView argument has got in your delegate methods.

In your case, your delegate/data source would be a class with a member of type NSArray and also implementing the UITableViewDelegate protocol.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes you can do it with tag. Give your UITableViews the tags 1 and 2.

set up an switch:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";

UITableViewCell *cell = (UITableViewCell *)[tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
if(cell == nil){
    cell = [[[UITableViewCell alloc]initWithStyle:UITableViewStylePlain reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease] ; 
}

switch ([tableView tag]) {
  case 1:{
    [[cell textLabel] setText:@"First tag"]
    break;
  }
  case 2:{
    [[cell textLabel] setText:@"Second tag"]
    break;
  }
  default:
    break;
}

return cell;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice usage of the tags, so much easier to handle multiple table –  Vincent Jun 18 '13 at 11:10
add comment

Each of those methods passes in a reference to the table view that's calling it. I usually connect each table to an outlet in interface builder and conditionally return the datasource based on a comparison with tableView in the delegate methods and the outlet names. Doing so with a tag is also possible but messier and more open to complications when editing your view structure.

share|improve this answer
add comment

try this link

in if condition provide your table view tag .hope helps you

TNQ

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.