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I see that java.net.URLDecoder.decode(String) is deprecated in 6.

I have the following String:

String url ="http://172.20.4.60/jsfweb/cat/%D7%9C%D7%97%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9D_%D7%A8%D7%92%D7%99%D7%9C%D7%99%D7%9"

How should I decode it in Java 6?

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marked as duplicate by Nenotlep, Brad Werth, greg-449, EdChum, Gerald Schneider Aug 29 '14 at 7:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Now you need to specify the character encoding of your string. Based off the information on the URLDecoder page:

Note: The World Wide Web Consortium Recommendation states that UTF-8 should be used. Not doing so may introduce incompatibilites.

The following should work for you:

java.net.URLDecoder.decode(url, "UTF-8");

Please see Draemon's answer below.

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4  
-1 this is just plain wrong. The documentation clearly states that this method uses application/x-www-form-urlencoded which is only used for the query string. –  Draemon Feb 17 '12 at 0:13
    
-1 see my comments on @Draemon's correct answer below. –  Bob Kerns Oct 23 '12 at 17:04
3  
This would be the correct answer, if the question were correct! If you were using the one-arg version of decode() correctly, you should use the two-argument version. –  Bob Kerns Oct 23 '12 at 17:06
    
+1 For directing users to the other answer. :) –  George Bailey Feb 13 '14 at 16:14
    
This answer is in fact correct, since the form encoding referenced defers to URL encoding. The media-type application/x-www-form-urlencoded refers to the encoding used for URL's, and the detailed rules specified by URLDecoder make it clear that it's perfectly valid for use in decoding a URL. So it's simpler, and probably faster to use URLDecoder. I recommend that you unstrike this answer. –  Lawrence Dol Dec 4 '14 at 20:31

You should use java.net.URI to do this, as the URLDecoder class does x-www-form-urlencoded decoding which is wrong (despite the name, it's for form data).

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4  
@whoever downvoted: care to elaborate on which part of this is wrong? –  Draemon Feb 17 '12 at 0:14
3  
This is the correct answer! This trips people up all the time. URLEncoder/URLDecoder encode and decode form data for URLs, not URLs themselves. The URL class provides the encoding and decoding of the URL itself. And the URI class is an updated, better specified, more general API -- every URL string is also a URI string, so use URI for parsing duties. The URL class itself warns against confusing the use of URLEncoder/Decoder: "The URLEncoder and URLDecoder classes can also be used, but only for HTML form encoding, which is not the same as the encoding scheme defined in RFC2396." –  Bob Kerns Oct 23 '12 at 17:02
2  
java.net.URI.decode() is private now –  Azee Feb 20 '14 at 16:03
    
The media-type application/x-www-form-urlencoded refers to the encoding used for URL's, and the detailed rules specified by URLDecoder make it clear that it's perfectly valid for use in decoding a URL. So it's simpler, and probably faster to use URLDecoder. –  Lawrence Dol Dec 4 '14 at 20:30

As the documentation mentions, decode(String) is deprecated because it always uses the platform default encoding, which is often wrong.

Use the two-argument version instead. You will need to specify the encoding used n the escaped parts.

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Only the decode(String) method is deprecated. You should use the decode(String, String) method to explicitly set a character encoding for decoding.

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As noted by previous posters, you should use java.net.URI class to do it:

System.out.println(String.format("Decoded URI: '%s'", new URI(url).getPath()));

What I want to note additionally is that if you have a path fragment of a URI and want to decode it separately, the same approach with one-argument constructor works, but if you try to use four-argument constructor it does not:

String fileName = "Map%20of%20All%20projects.pdf";
URI uri = new URI(null, null, fileName, null);
System.out.println(String.format("Not decoded URI *WTF?!?*: '%s'", uri.getPath()));

This was tested in Oracle JDK 7. The fact that this does not work is counter-intuitive, runs contrary to JavaDocs and it should be probably considered a bug.

It could trip people who are trying to use an approach symmetrical to encoding. As noted for example in this post: "how to encode URL to avoid special characters in java", in order to encode URI, it's a good idea to construct a URI by passing different URI parts separately since different encoding rules apply to different parts:

String fileName2 = "Map of All projects.pdf";
URI uri2 = new URI(null, null, fileName2, null);
System.out.println(String.format("Encoded URI: '%s'", uri2.toASCIIString()));
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