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I came over this, where "not None" equals both True and False simultaneously.

>>> not None
True

>>> not None == True
True

>>> not None == False
True

At first I expected that this would be because of the order of operators, but however when testing a similar expression:

>>> not False
True

>>> not False == False
False

>>> not False == True
True

Can anyone explain why this is happening?

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I found this page very useful –  Dog eat cat world Jun 29 '11 at 12:04
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4 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

This is due to operator precedence. not none == True means not (None == True) means None != True, which is true. Similarly, None != False is also true. The value None is distinct from the booleans.

Your last two expressions mean False != False, which is false, and False != True, which is true.

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Great! So my error was not to do (not None) == True ? –  Dog eat cat world Jun 29 '11 at 11:56
7  
@Dog eat cat world: yes. But then, keep in mind that (not None) == True is true, while (not True) == None is false, since None != False. To convert a value that may be None to a boolean, call bool on it. –  larsmans Jun 29 '11 at 11:59
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This is indeed due to operator precedence. not None == False will be evaluated as not (None == False). None == False is False, which explains your results.

Try this instead:

>>> (not None) == True
True
>>> (not None) == False
False
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>>> not None
True
>>> not None == True
True
>>> not None == False
True
>>> (not None) == True
True
>>> (not None) == False
False
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It is the order of expansion. python reads them like this

o>>> not (None == True)
True
>>> not (None == False)
True
>>> not False
True
>>> not (False == False)
False
>>> not (False == True)
True
>>>

I think this makes it clear.

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