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I've got a wildcard pattern, perhaps "*.txt" or "POS??.dat".

I also have list of filenames in memory that I need to compare to that pattern.

How would I do that, keeping in mind I need exactly the same semantics that IO.DirectoryInfo.GetFiles(pattern) uses.

EDIT: Blindly translating this into a regex will NOT work.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I have a complete answer in code for you that's 95% like FindFiles(string).

The 5% that isn't there is the short names/long names behavior in the second note on the MSDN documentation for this function.

If you would still like to get that behavior, you'll have to complete a computation of the short name of each string you have in the input array, and then add the long name to the collection of matches if either the long or short name matches the pattern.

Here is the code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace FindFilesRegEx
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] names = { "hello.t", "HelLo.tx", "HeLLo.txt", "HeLLo.txtsjfhs", "HeLLo.tx.sdj", "hAlLo20984.txt" };
            string[] matches;
            matches = FindFilesEmulator("hello.tx", names);
            matches = FindFilesEmulator("H*o*.???", names);
            matches = FindFilesEmulator("hello.txt", names);
            matches = FindFilesEmulator("lskfjd30", names);
        }

        public string[] FindFilesEmulator(string pattern, string[] names)
        {
            List<string> matches = new List<string>();
            Regex regex = FindFilesPatternToRegex.Convert(pattern);
            foreach (string s in names)
            {
                if (regex.IsMatch(s))
                {
                    matches.Add(s);
                }
            }
            return matches.ToArray();
        }

        internal static class FindFilesPatternToRegex
        {
            private static Regex HasQuestionMarkRegEx   = new Regex(@"\?", RegexOptions.Compiled);
            private static Regex IlegalCharactersRegex  = new Regex("[" + @"\/:<>|" + "\"]", RegexOptions.Compiled);
            private static Regex CatchExtentionRegex    = new Regex(@"^\s*.+\.([^\.]+)\s*$", RegexOptions.Compiled);
            private static string NonDotCharacters      = @"[^.]*";
            public static Regex Convert(string pattern)
            {
                if (pattern == null)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentNullException();
                }
                pattern = pattern.Trim();
                if (pattern.Length == 0)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("Pattern is empty.");
                }
                if(IlegalCharactersRegex.IsMatch(pattern))
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("Patterns contains ilegal characters.");
                }
                bool hasExtension = CatchExtentionRegex.IsMatch(pattern);
                bool matchExact = false;
                if (HasQuestionMarkRegEx.IsMatch(pattern))
                {
                    matchExact = true;
                }
                else if(hasExtension)
                {
                    matchExact = CatchExtentionRegex.Match(pattern).Groups[1].Length != 3;
                }
                string regexString = Regex.Escape(pattern);
                regexString = "^" + Regex.Replace(regexString, @"\\\*", ".*");
                regexString = Regex.Replace(regexString, @"\\\?", ".");
                if(!matchExact && hasExtension)
                {
                    regexString += NonDotCharacters;
                }
                regexString += "$";
                Regex regex = new Regex(regexString, RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
                return regex;
            }
        }
    }
}
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2  
Nice, you clearly put quite a bit of thought into that. –  Jonathan Allen May 20 '11 at 4:48
1  
Great piece of code. The HasAsteriskRegex variable is never used. –  Dor Rotman Nov 3 '11 at 17:06
    
@Dor Rotman, Thanks... I edited the code accordingly. I probably initially thought I'd have to check the asterisk for pattern correctness and forgot to remove the unused RegEx later on. –  sprite Nov 13 '11 at 6:40
    
*.txt matches HeLLo.txtsjfhs which is wrong in my opinion, kewljibin's answer works properly for *.txt but doesn't deal with upper/lower case –  Graham Sep 13 '12 at 14:39
    
@Graham Open a command window and try it, I just did. dir .txt returns both "HeLLo.txt" and "HeLLo.txtsjfhs". Also, if you look at the link in my post, you will see the behavior defined in the DirectoryInfo.GetFiles Method in MSDN is this exact behavior. There's a lengthy comment there and some samples. Here they are: ".abc" returns files having an extension of.abc,.abcd,.abcde,.abcdef, and so on. ".abcd" returns only files having an extension of.abcd. ".abcde" returns only files having an extension of.abcde. "*.abcdef" returns only files having an extension of.abcdef. –  sprite Sep 19 '12 at 14:28

You can simply do this. You do not need regular expressions.

using Microsoft.VisualBasic.CompilerServices;

if (Operators.LikeString("pos123.txt", "pos?23.*", CompareMethod.Text))
{
  Console.WriteLine("Filename matches pattern");
}
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For anyone who comes across this question now that it is years later, I found over at the MSDN social boards that the GetFiles() method will accept * and ? wildcard characters in the searchPattern parameter. (At least in .Net 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5)

Directory.GetFiles(string path, string searchPattern)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wz42302f.aspx

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The use of RegexOptions.IgnoreCase will fix it.

public class WildcardPattern : Regex {
    public WildcardPattern(string wildCardPattern)
        : base(ConvertPatternToRegex(wildCardPattern), RegexOptions.IgnoreCase) {
    }

    public WildcardPattern(string wildcardPattern, RegexOptions regexOptions)
        : base(ConvertPatternToRegex(wildcardPattern), regexOptions) {
    }

    private static string ConvertPatternToRegex(string wildcardPattern) {
        string patternWithWildcards = Regex.Escape(wildcardPattern).Replace("\\*", ".*");
        patternWithWildcards = string.Concat("^", patternWithWildcards.Replace("\\?", "."), "$");
        return patternWithWildcards;
    }
}
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Does it answer the question? –  Fazovsky Jan 17 at 8:12

Plz try the below code.

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string _wildCardPattern = "*.txt";

        List<string> _fileNames = new List<string>();
        _fileNames.Add("text_file.txt");
        _fileNames.Add("csv_file.csv");

        Console.WriteLine("\nFilenames that matches [{0}] pattern are : ", _wildCardPattern);
        foreach (string _fileName in _fileNames)
        {
            CustomWildCardPattern _patetrn = new CustomWildCardPattern(_wildCardPattern);
            if (_patetrn.IsMatch(_fileName))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0}", _fileName);
            }
        }

    }

public class CustomWildCardPattern : Regex
{
    public CustomWildCardPattern(string wildCardPattern)
        : base(WildcardPatternToRegex(wildCardPattern))
    {
    }

    public CustomWildCardPattern(string wildcardPattern, RegexOptions regexOptions)
        : base(WildcardPatternToRegex(wildcardPattern), regexOptions)
    {
    }

    private static string WildcardPatternToRegex(string wildcardPattern)
    {
        string patternWithWildcards = "^" + Regex.Escape(wildcardPattern).Replace("\\*", ".*");
        patternWithWildcards = patternWithWildcards.Replace("\\?", ".") + "$";
        return patternWithWildcards;
    }
}
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This one works better than sprite's answer on *.txt, but this one doesn't take into account upper and lower case and didn't like *.txt? –  Graham Sep 13 '12 at 14:32
1  
This behavior doesn't match the one in the question. It was requested to match DirectoryInfo.GetFiles Method. –  sprite Sep 19 '12 at 14:49

Some kind of regex/glob is the way to go, but there are some subtleties; your question indicates you want identical semantics to IO.DirectoryInfo.GetFiles. That could be a challenge, because of the special cases involving 8.3 vs. long file names and the like. The whole story is on MSDN.

If you don't need an exact behavioral match, there are a couple of good SO questions:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/188892/glob-pattern-matching-in-net
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/398518/how-to-implement-glob-in-c

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You could translate the wildcards into a regular expression:

*.txt -> ^.+\.txt$

POS??.dat _> ^POS..\.dat$

Use the Regex.Escape method to escape the characters that are not wildcars into literal strings for the pattern (e.g. converting ".txt" to "\.txt").

The wildcard * translates into .+, and ? translates into .

Put ^ at the beginning of the pattern to match the beginning of the string, and $ at the end to match the end of the string.

Now you can use the Regex.IsMatch method to check if a file name matches the pattern.

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-1 because this answer is just flat wrong. It almost works for the two examples posted, except you need to make sure that the regex is made case-insensitive. But the behavior of GetFiles is rather complex. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8he88b63.aspx for details. –  Jim Mischel Mar 16 '09 at 21:01
    
Thanks for the attempt, but like I said it needs to match GetFiles exactly and this won't. –  Jonathan Allen Mar 17 '09 at 17:36
    
Well, it's not possible to get the same behaviour as GetFiles with a list of file names, as it's impossible to know what the short file names were. –  Guffa Mar 17 '09 at 21:39
1  
-1 for incorrectness. Sorry but Jim is right. The case insensitivity is the small problem, it doesn't behave like GetFiles(string) regarding the presence or not of '*' or '?' characters in the pattern. Read the MSDN article that Jim poster in his comment. –  sprite Dec 7 '10 at 10:03
    
you can get pretty close to it with everything except the short names. You could even get close to the short name behavior if you make some assumptions. For example, assuming that the names of the files should be converted to short names by their order in the input you can emulate the behavior. e.g. if you have longfilename.txt and longfileothername.txt then they would be longfi~1.txt and longfi~2.txt in respect to the order in the array. If you look at my code sample below I gave a solution with all but short names (and a comment on what's missing to emulate it). –  sprite Dec 7 '10 at 10:08

Just use a Regex class. Initialize it with the wildcard pattern that you are thinking of and then use the .IsMatch(filename) method to check each filename to see if it matches.

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most regexes use different syntax than the typical shell globbing the OP is talking about. I don't know if that's the case in .net or not. –  rmeador Mar 16 '09 at 20:38
    
You can't just blindly translate wildcard patterns into regular expressions. –  Jonathan Allen Mar 17 '09 at 17:20
    
Actually, I was aware that you can't translate wildcard patterns into regex .. I just assumed the OP would understand he needs to translate *.txt to the equivalent regex when he would use the regex class. –  Sanjay Sheth Mar 18 '09 at 22:42
    
Sorry but I had to vote this down. This is flat out wrong. The format for wildcard pattern doesn't translate to a regex with the same meaning as in the MSDN documentation of DirectoryInfo.GetFiles Method. –  sprite Nov 27 '12 at 14:05

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