Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to learn OpenGL ES 2.0 on Android. I run through a few books and web tutorials on the subject. However, I've noticed that most websites and books focus on OpenGL ES 1.x versions. If they do teach both, version 1.x is often the main focus while version 2.x is kind of just glanced over. I assume it's because version 1.x has simply been out longer.

From what I can gather, the main difference is that OpenGL ES 1.x is easier to learn but not as flexible.

Is OpenGL ES 1.x still worth learning? Is there a reason to use it over OpenGL ES 2.x, or is it pretty much dead?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is OpenGL ES 1.x still worth learning?

Yes.

Is there a reason to use it over OpenGL ES 2.x, or is it pretty much dead?

Almost every Android phone supports OpenGL ES 1.x. However, Android NDK 2.0 (and higher) and Android SDK 2.2 (and higher) supports OpenGL ES 2.x. The version you target depends on your requirements. If you want to target earlier versions of Android OS (such as 1.5, 1.6) you will need to use OpenGL ES 1.x in order to support these devices, and that is one of the reasons why you should learn OpenGL ES 1.x.

share|improve this answer
    
In that case, is there a reason to use OpenGL ES 2.x over 1.x for simple applications? If I can achieve my render with 1.x, is there a reason to implement both in case the phone does support 2.x? (faster? Less memory? etc.) –  DeeV Jun 29 '11 at 17:29
    
Yes, there is a reason. If the phone supports OpenGL ES 2.x and you're running OpenGL ES 1.x code on it, the OpenGL ES 1.x will run in a sort of "emulator mode" if the phone supports OpenGL ES 2.x. –  Wroclai Jun 29 '11 at 17:34
1  
One caveat. Android emulator does 1.x just fine, but not 2.0. –  kert Aug 15 '11 at 15:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.