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This is a variation on a question asked so many times. Given any element, I want to be able to find any other element after it in the entire document. It can be a sibling but it could also be any other element that occurs afterward. For example, given the following markup,

<div>
    <p>Hello</p>
    <div>
        <p>Foo</p>
        <p class="bar">Bar</p>
        <p>rawr!</p>
    </div>
    <p>bop</p>
    <input/>
    <div>
        <p>Another</p>
        <div>
            <span>something</span>
            <p>deep!</p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>
<p>last</p>

For the sake of this description, lets say the function I am looking for is called $.fn.nextInDocument. If I called:

$('.bar').nextInDocument('p'); //  <p>rawr</p>
$('.bar').nextInDocument('p').nextInDocument('p'); //  <p>bop</p>

Continuing on, it would get <p>Another</p>, then <p>deep!</p> and finally <p>last</p>.

Does something like this exist? I don't care if it is a selector or a function. I just need the functionality.

EDIT Updated the DOM structure to make it a more challenging question yet more clear for what I am looking for.

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about this? It's a generic solution that uses DOM methods to traverse nodes in turn and tests each against the jQuery selector.

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/PsEdZ/3/

(function($) {
    function nextNode(node, omitChildren) {
        var sibling, parentNode;
        if (!omitChildren && node.hasChildNodes()) {
            return node.firstChild;
        } else {
            sibling = node.nextSibling;
            if (sibling) {
                return sibling;
            } else {
                parentNode = node.parentNode;
                return parentNode ? nextNode(parentNode, true) : null;
            }
        }
    }

    $.fn.nextInDocument = function(selector) {
        var node = this[0], $node;
        while ( (node = nextNode(node)) ) {
            $node = $(node);
            if ($node.is(selector)) {
                return $node;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
this seems like it works. testing a few tricky situations now... –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 15:22
    
this has held up to everything I threw at it so far. I wonder how well it performs, thought as of right now I am not planning on running in on excessively large pages. thanks so much! –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 20:33
    
@Jeff: It could probably be optimized: for example, I imagine that evaluating the selector for every node is a cause of possible performance problems. I'd suggest only bothering to do so if it's causing a bottleneck. –  Tim Down Jun 29 '11 at 22:57
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This should work. Not really sure it's useful, though...

;(function ($)
{
    $.fn.nextInDocument = function (s)
    {
        var self = this,
            next;
        do
        {
            next = self.nextAll(s).first();
            self = self.parent();
        }
        while (self.length && !next.length);

        return next;
    };
})(jQuery);

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/mattball/HAFn8/

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@Matt Ball it has some issues going into child elements after a current element, although I am not sure if he was even after functionality like that: jsfiddle.net/niklasvh/HAFn8/3 –  Niklas Jun 29 '11 at 13:01
    
Thanks for pointing that out. An obvious deficiency, it'll definitely make things more complicated if this is needed. Will need a better tree traversing algorithm. –  Matt Ball Jun 29 '11 at 13:03
    
I'm not quite sure how this works but it looks promising. I put it in a fiddle and there is no way to match a selector. In other words $('.bar').nextInDocument('p') == $('.bar').nextInDocument('div') == '<p>rawr!</p>. –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 13:15
    
jsfiddle.net/jeffrod/N9KEe/2 –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 13:15
    
my requirements do need to traverse back down the tree again, however unfortunate that may be –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 13:32
show 4 more comments
(function(jQuery) {
jQuery.fn.extend({
    nextInDocument: function(a) {
        if (jQuery(this).next(a).length === 0) {
            //console.log($(this).parent().nextInDocument('p'));
            jQuery(this).parent().nextInDocument(a);
        }
        else
            return jQuery(this).next(a);
    }
});
})(jQuery);
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thanks Boopathi. I'm not sure if I am missing something. I put this in a fiddle and your function returned the original element for each call, e.g. $('.bar').nextInDocument('div')==<p>rawr</p>. jsfiddle.net/jeffrod/nHeGU –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 13:25
    
sorry about that ... corrected it .. check it .. has one more minor bug. ll improve ... –  Boopathi Rajaa Jun 29 '11 at 13:38
    
im getting nulls back from this. it still doesnt appear to work –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 15:28
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Here's a POJS version:

function nextInDocument(el, tagName) {
  var node, nodes = document.getElementsByTagName('*');
  var start = false;
  tagName = tagName.toLowerCase();

  for (var i=0, iLen=nodes.length; i<iLen; i++) {
    node = nodes[i];
    if (!start) {
      if (node == el) start = true;
    } else {
      if (node.tagName.toLowerCase() == tagName) {
        return node;
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice solution for plain old js. thanks. jquery can make use of more complicated selectors though which makes some other snippets more attractive to my particular situation. –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 15:25
    
Be careful of this approach, you may find performance issues if you make the selectors too complex. Consider using classes instead so that the next element is much easier to find. –  RobG Jun 29 '11 at 22:52
    
good point. ill consider that if performance becomes an issue. –  Jeff Jun 30 '11 at 15:49
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take look at my code:

HTML

<div>
    <p>Hello</p>
    <div> 
        <p>Foo</p>
        <p>Fooooo</p>
        <p class="bar">Bar</p>
        <p>rawr!</p>
    </div>
    <p>bop</p>
    <input/>
    <div>
        <p>Another</p>
    </div>
</div>
<p>last</p>

<a class="show" href="#">!!!</a>

JS

$(function() {
    i = 0;
    start = 0;
    $('p').each(function() {
        if ($(this).hasClass('bar')) {
            start = i;
        }
        i++;
    });
    $('a.show').click( function(){
        alert($('p').eq(start+4).text());
    });
});

http://jsfiddle.net/mV8pm/

change start+X and you will get next 'p' tag

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. this seems like it is tightly coupled to the markup i gave in the demo, but i need something that can work "for any element" and grab "any element after it". i dont think this would be that flexible –  Jeff Jun 29 '11 at 13:40
    
i bet it will :) try it on different DOMs. all that you need is to put this code to JQ function. by the way, tag of start element (selected by class) and tags you are looking for after that should be the same (for example 'p'). –  bravedick Jun 29 '11 at 13:53
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