Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Is there an easy way of finding the neighbours (that is, the eight elements around an element) of an element in a two-dimensional array? Short of just subtracting and adding to the index in different combinations, like this:

array[i-1][i]
array[i-1][i-1]
array[i][i-1]
array[i+1][i]

... And so on.

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

(pseudo-code)

row_limit = count(array);
if(row_limit > 0){
  column_limit = count(array[0]);
  for(x = max(0, i-1); x <= min(i+1, row_limit); x++){
    for(y = max(0, j-1); y <= min(j+1, column_limit); y++){
      if(x != i || y != j){
        print array[x][y];
      }
    }
  }
}

Of course, that takes almost as many lines as the original hard-coded solution, but with this one you can extend the "neighborhood" as much as you can (2-3 or more cells away)

share|improve this answer
    
Add code to the if statement to check upper and lower bounds and it's perfect. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 16 '09 at 20:56
    
Not sure he'd want to do that; he's searching for all 8 neighbors, not just vertical || horizontal. Or did I miss something? –  Seb Mar 16 '09 at 20:59
    
Joel is saying that if you do this at the edges, without some boundry checking, you'll get an index out of bounds exception as you look for something like array[-1][4]. –  Beska Mar 16 '09 at 21:07
    
Got it, will correct now, thanks. –  Seb Mar 16 '09 at 21:10
    
@Seb Good job, thanks! –  Radu Matei Nov 10 '14 at 12:27

array[i][j] has neighbors

array[i-1][j]
array[i][j-1]
array[i-1][j-1]
array[i+1][j]
array[i][j+1]
array[i+1][j+1]
array[i+1][j-1]
array[i-1][j+1]

That's probably the fastest/easiest way is to just list all possible neighbors. Make sure to do index out of bound checking though.

Some languages might offer a shortcut way of doing this, but I don't know of any.

share|improve this answer

an alternative to @SebaGR, if your language supports this:

var deltas = { {x=-1, y=-1}, {x=0, y=-1}, {x=1, y=-1},
               {x=-1, y=0},               {x=1, y=0},
               {x=-1, y=1},  {x=0, y=1},  {x=1, y=1} };
foreach (var delta in deltas)
{
    if (x+delta.x < 0 || x + delta.x >= array.GetLength(0) ||
        y+delta.y < 0 || y + delta.y >= array.GetLength(1))
        continue;

    Console.WriteLine("{0}", array[x + delta.x, y + delta.y]);
}

Slight advantage in readability, possible performance if you can statically allocate the deltas.

share|improve this answer
    
Good proposal but bad style, so no upvote. Better avoid continue and use the positive condition. –  starblue Mar 16 '09 at 21:53

I think Ben is correct in his approach, though I might reorder it, to possibly improve locality.

array[i-1][j-1]
array[i-1][j]
array[i-1][j+1]

array[i][j-1]
array[i][j+1]

array[i+1][j-1]
array[i+1][j]
array[i+1][j+1]

One trick to avoid bounds checking issues, is to make the array dimensions 2 larger than needed. So, a little matrix like this

3 1 4
1 5 9
2 6 5

is actually implemented as

0 0 0 0 0
0 3 1 4 0
0 1 5 9 0
0 2 6 5 0
0 0 0 0 0

then while summing, I can subscript from 1 to 3 in both dimensions, and the array references above are guaranteed to be valid, and have no effect on the final sum. I am assuming c, and zero based subscripts for the example

share|improve this answer

Here is a working Javascript example from @seb original pseudo code:

function findingNeighbors(myArray, i, j) {
  var rowLimit = myArray.length-1;
  var columnLimit = myArray[0].length-1;

  for(var x = Math.max(0, i-1); x <= Math.min(i+1, rowLimit); x++) {
    for(var y = Math.max(0, j-1); y <= Math.min(j+1, columnLimit); y++) {
      if(x !== i || y !== j) {
        console.log(myArray[x][y]);
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

A lot depends on what your data is. For example, if your 2D array is a logical matrix, you could convert rows to integers and use bitwise operations to find the ones you want.

For a more general-purpose solution I think you're stuck with indexing, like SebaGR's solution.

share|improve this answer

Rows and Cols are total number of rows and cols

Define a CellIndex struct or class. Or you can just return the actual values instead of the indexes.

public List<CellIndex> GetNeighbors(int rowIndex, int colIndex)
{
var rowIndexes = (new int[] { rowIndex - 1, rowIndex, rowIndex + 1 }).Where(n => n >= 0 && n < Rows);

var colIndexes = (new int[] { colIndex - 1, colIndex, colIndex + 1 }).Where(n => n >= 0 && n < Cols);

return (from row in rowIndexes from col in colIndexes where row != rowIndex || col != colIndex select new CellIndex { Row = row, Col = col }).ToList();
}
share|improve this answer
private ArrayList<Element> getNeighbors(Element p) {
    ArrayList<Element> n = new ArrayList<Element>();

    for (int dr = -1; dr <= +1; dr++) {
        for (int dc = -1; dc <= +1; dc++) {
            int r = p.row + dr;
            int c = p.col + dc;

            if ((r >= 0) && (r < ROWS) && (c >= 0) && (c < COLS)) {
                // skip p
                if ((dr != 0) || (dc != 0))
                    n.add(new Element(r, c));
            }               
        }
    }

    return n;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.