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I have a real time app that tracks assets around a number of sites across the country. As part of this solution I have 8 client apps that update a central server.

My question is that sometimes the apps lose connection to the central server and I am wondering what is the best way to deal with this ? I know I could just increase the max send/receive times to deal with the timeout BUT I also want a graceful solution to deal with if the connection to the server is down:

For example I'm calling my services like this :

using (var statusRepository = new StatusRepositoryClient.StatusRepositoryClient())
{
    statusId = statusRepository.GetIdByName(licencePlateSeen.CameraId.ToString());
}

I was thinking of adding a try/catch so...

using (var statusRepository = new StatusRepositoryClient.StatusRepositoryClient())
{
    try
    {
       statusId = statusRepository.GetIdByName(licencePlateSeen.CameraId.ToString());
    }
    catch (TimeoutException timeout)
    {
       LogMessage(timeout);
    }
    catch (CommunicationException comm)
    {
       LogMessage(comm);
    }
}

Dealing it this way doesn't allow me to rerun the code without having a ton of code repeat. Any one got any suggestions ?

EDIT: Looking into Sixto Saez and user24601 answers having an overall solution is better than dealing with timeouts on an individual exception level BUT... I'm was thinking that the below would solve my problem (but it would add a TON of extra code error handling):

void Method(int statusId)
{
     var statusRepository = new StatusRepositoryClient.StatusRepositoryClient()

      try
      {
         IsServerUp();
         statusId = statusRepository.GetIdByName(licencePlateSeen.CameraId.ToString());
         statusRepository.Close(); 
      }            
      catch (Exception ex)
      {
            statusRepository.Abort();

            if (ex is TimeoutException || ex is CommunicationException)
            {
              LogMessage(timeout);
              Method(statusId);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new Exception(ex.Message + ex.InnerException);
            }
        }

  }
}

bool IsServerUp()
{
    var x = new Ping();
    var reply = x.Send(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"));

    if (reply == null)
    {
       IsServerUp();
    }
    else
    {
       if (reply.Status != IPStatus.Success)
       {
          IsServerUp();
       }
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
You could write a function that tests if the server is up, this way you can check if the server is up before you make a connection to the repository. You can also go into a look until the server is up. –  Jethro Jun 29 '11 at 13:19
    
So make a recursive function that doesn't exit until the servers up then continue... and pop the call before any wcf call ? I like the idea and it would be less code than the edit I mentioned above.. Your idea definitely improves reliability 99% but how would I deal if the server lost connection between the check and the method call ? –  Jon Jones Jun 29 '11 at 14:25
    
@Jethro: Best practices advise against the ping method. See the discussion here: stackoverflow.com/questions/2166356/… Basic idea is that the timeout might be a result of a service dependency which wouldn't show up in a ping event (such as a WCF service that interacts with a database where the database causes the timeout) –  VoteCoffee May 14 at 17:57

4 Answers 4

Hi Please see my solution below. Also please note that the below code has not been compliled so may have some logic and typing errors.

bool IsServerUp()
{
    var x = new Ping();
    var reply = x.Send(IPAddress.Parse("127.0.0.1"));

if (reply == null) return false;

return reply.Status == IPStatus.Success ? true : false;
} 

int? GetStatusId()
{
try 
{
    using (var statusRepository = new  StatusRepositoryClient.StatusRepositoryClient())
    {
        return statusRepository.GetIdByName(licencePlateSeen.CameraId.ToString());
    }
}catch(TimeoutException te)
{
    //Log TimeOutException occured
    return null;
}
}

void GetStatus()
{
try
{
    TimeSpan sleepTime = new TimeSpan(0,0,5);
    int maxRetries = 10;

    while(!IsServerUp())
    {
        System.Threading.Thead.Sleep(sleepTime);
    }

    int? statusId = null;
    int retryCount = 0;

    while (!statusId.HasValue)
    {
        statusId = GetStatusId();
        retryCount++;

        if (retryCount > maxRetries)
            throw new ApplicationException(String.Format("{0} Maximum Retries reached in order to get StatusId", maxRetries));
        System.Threading.Thead.Sleep(sleepTime);
    }
}catch(Exception ex)
{
    //Log Exception Occured
}
} 
share|improve this answer

I have a two-pronged approach to verifying the server is up:

1) I have set up a 'PING' to the server every 5 seconds. The server responds with a 'PONG' and a load rating (low, medium, high, so the client can adjust its load on the server). If the client EVER doesn't receive a pong it assumes the server is down (since this is very low stress on the server - just listen and respond).

2) Random timeouts like the one you are catching are logged in a ConnectionMonitor class along with all successful connections. A single one of these calls timing out is not enough to consider the server down since some may be very processor heavy, or may just take a very long time. However, a high enough percentage of these will cause the application to go into server timeout.

I also didn't want to throw up a message for every single connection timeout, because it was happening too frequently to people who use poorer servers (or just some computer lying in their lab as a server). Most of my calls can be missed once or twice, but missing 5 or 6 calls are clearly going to cause instrusion.

When a server-timeout state happens, I throw up a little dialog box explaining what's happening to the user.

share|improve this answer

Prior to designing your exception handling, one important decision to make is whether you want guaranteed delivery of each message the client sends or is it OK for the service to "lose" some. For guaranteed delivery, the best built-in solution is the netMsmqBinding assuming the client can be configured to support it. Otherwise, there is a lightweight reliable messaging capability built into WCF. You'll be going down a rabbit hole if you try to handle message delivery purely through exception handling... :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks will look into –  Jon Jones Jun 29 '11 at 14:03

For starters I think your Wcf error handling is wrong. It should look like this

var statusRepository = new StatusRepositoryClient.StatusRepositoryClient();
try
{
    statusId = statusRepository.GetIdByName(licencePlateSeen.CameraId.ToString());
    statusRepository.Close()
}
catch(Exception e)
{
   statusRepository.Abort();
   LogMessage(e);
   throw; //I would do this to let user know.
}

I would also re-throw the error to let the user know about the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
What's the benefit from me handling the close/abort over letting the garbage collector automatically fire when the using statements finished ? –  Jon Jones Jun 29 '11 at 13:59
1  
Here is a good post to read about the Dispose pattern implementation in WCF and why you should never use the using statment with it, –  Sixto Saez Jun 29 '11 at 14:30

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