Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to store all digits of a decimal number.I have decided to use modf for this purpose.My code segment is;

struct high_precision scan_high(int *j)
{
    int i,a;
    struct high_precision mynum;
    double num1, fracpart, intpart;
    printf("Enter the values> ");
    scanf("%lf", &num1);
    if( num1 < 0 )
        mynum.sign = -1;
    else
        mynum.sign = 1;
    num1 = fabs(num1);
    fracpart = modf(num1, &intpart);
    if ( intpart > 0 && intpart < 10 )
        a = 1;
    while( intpart == 0 ) {
        fracpart *= 10;
        fracpart = modf(fracpart, &intpart);
        a -= 1;
    }
    for(i=0;fracpart > 0 && intpart != 0;i++){
        if( intpart > 0 ){
            mynum.digits[i] = intpart;
        }
        fracpart *= 10;
        fracpart = modf(fracpart, &intpart);
    }
    *j = i;
    mynum.decpt = a;

    return(mynum);
}

But somehow it doesn't work as I want.For instance;

Enter the values> 0.009876
    0.876000 9.000000
    0.760000 8.000000
    0.600000 7.000000

It must stop at this line.But, it is continuing to count;

1.000000 5.000000
1.000000 9.000000
1.000000 9.000000
1.000000 9.000000
1.000000 9.000000
1.000000 9.000000
0.999998 9.000000
0.999977 9.000000
0.999767 9.000000
0.997669 9.000000
0.976694 9.000000
0.766942 9.000000
0.669420 7.000000
0.694198 6.000000
0.941983 6.000000
0.419827 9.000000
0.198267 4.000000
0.982671 1.000000
0.826707 9.000000
0.267069 8.000000
0.000000 2.000000
0.000000 0.000000
share|improve this question

That's because floating point numbers aren't stored exactly (e.g. aren't exactly representable). Here's an example you can use to illustrate this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
  double x = 0.009876;
  printf("%.20lf\n",x);
  return 0;
}

---------- Capture Output ----------
> "c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe" /c c:\temp\temp.exe
0.00987599999999999940

> Terminated with exit code 0.
share|improve this answer

I think you are not doing things properly, let me tell why: scanf("%lf", &num1);.

Here you are already converting the input to double... so you won't get this "high precision scan" you are trying because it is getting "lost" in that first conversion.

If you want the actual decimal numbers, you should find the . in the ascii string and convert it to and int there.

EDIT I coded a little program, is this what you had in mind?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int split_decimal(const char * in, int * intpart, unsigned int * decimals) {

    char * dot = strchr(in, '.');

    if (!dot) {
        *intpart = atoi(in);
        *decimals = 0;
        return 0;
    }

    *decimals = atoi(dot+1);
    *intpart = atoi(in);

    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {

    int intpart;
    unsigned int decimals;

    split_decimal("-1.337", &intpart, &decimals);
    printf("%d.%d\n", intpart, decimals);
    split_decimal("50", &intpart, &decimals);
    printf("%d.%d\n", intpart, decimals);

    return 0;
}

Output:

-1.337
50.0
share|improve this answer
    
I want to count all decimal digits into an array(size 20).For example 8.127 myhigh.digit = "8","1","2","7" – mustafaSarialp Jun 29 '11 at 13:42
1  
so you want to simply remove the . and store all the digits on a string? – hexa Jun 29 '11 at 14:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.