Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to get the date & time of the last boot / reboot / restart on Windows 2008/2003 machine?

I know from command prompt we can use "net statistics", but how to do it via Delphi?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Can't you use WMI for this? –  Roald van Doorn Jun 29 '11 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use the LastBootUpTime property of the Win32_OperatingSystem WMI Class, which return the Date and time the operating system was last restarted (Note : the returned value of this property is in UTC format).

Check this sample app

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils,
  ActiveX,
  Variants,
  ComObj;


//Universal Time (UTC) format of YYYYMMDDHHMMSS.MMMMMM(+-)OOO.
//20091231000000.000000+000
function UtcToDateTime(const V : OleVariant): TDateTime;
var
  Dt : OleVariant;
begin
  Result:=0;
  if VarIsNull(V) then exit;
  Dt:=CreateOleObject('WbemScripting.SWbemDateTime');
  Dt.Value := V;
  Result:=Dt.GetVarDate;
end;

procedure  GetWin32_OperatingSystemInfo;
const
  WbemUser            ='';
  WbemPassword        ='';
  WbemComputer        ='localhost';
  wbemFlagForwardOnly = $00000020;
var
  FSWbemLocator : OLEVariant;
  FWMIService   : OLEVariant;
  FWbemObjectSet: OLEVariant;
  FWbemObject   : OLEVariant;
  oEnum         : IEnumvariant;
  iValue        : LongWord;
begin;
  FSWbemLocator := CreateOleObject('WbemScripting.SWbemLocator');
  FWMIService   := FSWbemLocator.ConnectServer(WbemComputer, 'root\CIMV2', WbemUser, WbemPassword);
  FWbemObjectSet:= FWMIService.ExecQuery('SELECT * FROM Win32_OperatingSystem','WQL',wbemFlagForwardOnly);
  oEnum         := IUnknown(FWbemObjectSet._NewEnum) as IEnumVariant;
  if oEnum.Next(1, FWbemObject, iValue) = 0 then
  begin
    Writeln(Format('Last BootUp Time    %s',[FWbemObject.LastBootUpTime]));// In utc format
    Writeln(Format('Last BootUp Time    %s',[formatDateTime('dd-mm-yyyy hh:nn:ss',UtcToDateTime(FWbemObject.LastBootUpTime))]));// Datetime
  end;
end;


begin
 try
    CoInitialize(nil);
    try
      GetWin32_OperatingSystemInfo;
    finally
      CoUninitialize;
    end;
 except
    on E:Exception do
        Writeln(E.Classname, ':', E.Message);
 end;
 Writeln('Press Enter to exit');
 Readln;
end.
share|improve this answer
1  
@Downvoter Why obscure? can you explain? –  RRUZ Jun 29 '11 at 16:41
3  
@Downvoter: I have to agree with RRUZ. WMI is pretty documented through MS Platform SDK. There's no obscurity here. –  Fabricio Araujo Jun 29 '11 at 19:32
1  
This doesn't work on my Win7 64 laptop. –  Misha Jun 30 '11 at 0:49
1  
@Misha, how you know which is the wrong time? try comparing the value returned against this systeminfo | find "System Boot Time:" (run from the CMD.exe) –  RRUZ Jun 30 '11 at 1:33
1  
@Misha read this article petri.co.il/check-uptime-in-server-2008.htm here you will find the differences between the methods to determine the windows uptime or the windows last boot time. –  RRUZ Jun 30 '11 at 2:44

The GetTickCount function (see MSDN) returns the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since the system was started, so divide it with 1000 to get seconds, with 60 000 to get minutes etc.

The topic I linked also contains this bit:

To obtain the time elapsed since the computer was started, retrieve the System Up Time counter in the performance data in the registry key HKEY_PERFORMANCE_DATA. The value returned is an 8-byte value. For more information, see Performance Counters.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, you can substract the runtime from the current time and you'll get the boot time. –  Cosmin Prund Jun 29 '11 at 13:36
2  
-1 because this doesn't work. GetTickCount returns a 32-bit unsigned integer, the maximum value of which is 4294967295. Intepreted as a number of milliseconds, this equals slightly less than 50 days. That is, when the computer has been running for 50 days, the tick count-approach will incorrectly say that the computer was just recently started. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jun 29 '11 at 13:37
    
That's why you use the GetTickCount64 on Vista+, but pretty close to the correct answer. –  Cosmin Prund Jun 29 '11 at 13:42
2  
@Andreas It will roll over after 49.7 days. There is also GetTickCount64 function which "should be enough for everybody", but it is supported from Vista on (BTW noticed now that this is what OP is using). I also quoted the performance counter info which doesn't suffer from the 32 bit limitation. –  ain Jun 29 '11 at 13:47
1  
What about when you suspend your machine? Doesn't that stop the tick counter? –  David Heffernan Jun 29 '11 at 13:52

Here's a bit of code that uses GetTickCount64 if available and falls back to GetTickCount if unavailable to compute the date and time of system startup. This is not a perfect solution because GetTickCount64 is only supported on Vista+ : if you're on older Windows, the counter goes back to 0 every 49 days.

program Project29;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Windows;

type
  TGetTickCount64 = function : Int64; stdcall;

var
  H_K32: HMODULE;
  Tick64Proc: TGetTickCount64;

function BootTime: TDateTime;
var UpTime: Int64;
    Seconds, Minutes, Hours: Int64;
begin
  if H_K32 = 0 then
  begin
    H_K32 := LoadLibrary(kernel32);
    if H_K32 = 0 then
      RaiseLastOSError
    else
      begin
        Tick64Proc := GetProcAddress(H_K32, 'GetTickCount64');
     end;
  end;

  if Assigned(Tick64Proc) then
    UpTime := Tick64Proc
  else
    UpTime := GetTickCount;

  Result := Now - EncodeTime(0, 0, 0, 1) * UpTime;
end;

begin
  WriteLn(DateTimeToStr(BootTime));
  ReadLn;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the best I can get. Tested on Windows 2003 server, it uses GetTickCount. While Windows 2008 server uses GetTickCount64. It shame that there is no simple API to get this information though. –  ewlung Jun 29 '11 at 14:36
    
@ewlung, there is, "System Up Time" performance counter, see ain's answer. –  Premature Optimization Jun 29 '11 at 16:04

Here is a complete command line application that does what you are talking about. I've modified this to avoid the GetTickCount overflow issues without relying on external function calls.

Example output:

Windows was last rebooted at: 06/29/2011 9:22:47 AM

Have fun!

program lastboottime;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils,
  Windows;

function UptimeInDays: double;
const
  c_SecondsInADay = 86400;
var
  cnt, freq: Int64;
begin
  QueryPerformanceCounter(cnt);
  QueryPerformanceFrequency(freq);
  Result := (cnt / freq) / c_SecondsInADay;
end;

function LastBootTime: TDateTime;
begin
  Result := Now() - UptimeInDays;
end;

begin
  try
    WriteLn('Windows was last rebooted at: ' + DateTimeToStr(LastBootTime));
    ReadLn;
  except on E: Exception do
    Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
I guess it would be unfair of me not to give a downvote here as well... Sorry... :( –  Andreas Rejbrand Jun 29 '11 at 14:02
    
Yes, it would have been. I have since corrected my answer. –  JosephStyons Jun 29 '11 at 14:08
    
This is essentially what I use and works on my Win7 64 laptop whereas the WMI version does not. For 1 week up-time my version is accurate to +/- around 10 seconds –  Misha Jun 30 '11 at 0:51
    
The WMI version also appears to work, but for one blip, which since I have rebooted the offending machine, cannot be tested. –  Misha Jun 30 '11 at 6:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.