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I have created a couple of interfaces to describe a collection and its items: IetCollection and IetCollectionItem. And of course I have two classes implementing these two interfaces: TetCollection and TetCollectionItem (both inheriting from TInterfacedObject.)

Then I have a series of interfaces where the top level interfaces inherits from IetCollectionItem and the rest from it (lets call them ISomeBasicType and ISomeSpecificType1 and ISomeSpecificType2.)

The class TSomeBasicType inherits from class TetCollectionItem and also implemented ISomeBasicType. The other classes in the hierarchy inherit from TSomeBasicType and implement their respective interfaces (i.e. ISomeSpecificType1 and ISomeSpecificType2.)

When I populate a collection I use a factory method to get a reference to ISomeBasicType. Everything works just fine up to that point.

But when I try to traverse the collection and ask if a collection item supports either ISomeSpecificType1 or ISomeSpecificType2 the answer I get is no.

I have been trying to solve this problem and I have achieved nothing, so any help will be greatly appreciated.

Here is some code:

// This is the basic type
IetCollectionItem = interface
end;

// Implementation of the basic type
TetCollectionItem = class(TInterfacedObject, IetCollectionItem)
end; 

ISomeBasicType = interface(IetCollectionItem)
end; 

ISomeSpecificType1 = interface(ISomeBasicType)
end; 

// Implements ISomeBasicType, should inherit implementation of IetCollectionItem
// from TetCollectionItem
TSomeBasicType = class(TetCollectionItem, ISomeBasicType)
end; 

// Implements ISomeSpecificType1, should inherit implementation of ISomeBasicType
// from TSomeBasicType and implementation of IetCollectionItem from
// TetCollectionItem
TSomeSpecificType1 = class(TSomeBasicType, ISomeSpecificType1)
end; 

This is the code I user to populate the collection:

var
  aBaseType: ISomeBasicType;
  aSpecificType: ISomeSpecificType1;
begin
  aBaseType:= TheFactory(anID, aType);  // Returns a reference to ISomeBasicType

  if Supports(aBaseType, ISomeSpecificType1, aSpecificType) then
  begin
    // Do something to the specific type
    aTypeCollection.Add(aSpecificType);
  end
  else
    aTypeCollection.Add(aBaseType);

And here is the code which fails: I loop through the collection and I check to see if any of the items in it support one of the child interfaces.

var
  iCount: Integer;
  aBaseType: ISomeBasicType;
  aSpecificType: ISomeSpecificType1;
begin
  for iCount:= 0 to Pred(aTypeCollection.Count) do
  begin
    aBaseType:= aTypeCollection[iCount];

    // This is where Supports fails
    if Supports(aBaseType, ISomeSpecificType1, aSpecificType) then
    begin
    end;
  end;
end;

And here is the code for TheFactory:

function TheFactory(const anID: Integer; const aType: TetTypes): ISomeBasicType;
begin
  Result:= nil;

  case aType of
    ptType1 : Result:= TSomeSpecificType1.Create(anID, aType);
    ptType2 : Result:= TSomeSpecificType2.Create(anID, aType);
  end;

  Assert(Assigned(Result), rcUnknonwPhenomenonType);
end;  {TheFactory}
share|improve this question
    
This is very hard to follow without code. Could you add to your question a minimal sample that illustrates the problem. My head hurts at the moment!! ;-) –  David Heffernan Jun 29 '11 at 13:42
    
Well the answer is correct isn't it? If you are populating the collection with ISomeBasicType it does NOT support the inherited classes. The other way around would be OK IsomespecificType1 does support ISomeBasicType. Or have I misunderstood you? –  Despatcher Jun 29 '11 at 14:01
    
Show the FAILING code as well, and please remove the ... because they make the code difficult to read. Do you get a compile time error or a run time error? Are you using a as cast or a QueryInterface cast? –  Cosmin Prund Jun 29 '11 at 14:05
1  
Yes, I do have GUIDs. I omitted them for brevity. –  Angelos Arampatzis Jun 29 '11 at 14:21
4  
How on earth can we answer this?! Please spend your time (not ours) making a code sample that we can compile and that exhibits the fault. If you do so you'll probably find that doing so is enough to clarify your thoughts to solve it yourself. Please learn to spend more time simplifying and expressing your problem concisely and clearly. That seems to be your fundamental problem. –  David Heffernan Jun 29 '11 at 15:03
show 9 more comments

3 Answers 3

Although your code makes me quite dizzy, just from your question title I have a feeling I know where your problem is. Delphi's interface polymorphism unfortunately doesn't behave like Delphi's class polymorphism (I somewhere read that this back in the days had to do with some COM interface compatibility). The point is, that if you are querying a class instance for a specific interface Delphi only finds those interfaces that are directly listed in the class declaration, although another interface in a class declaration might have been inherited from the one you are querying for. See this simple example to understand what I mean. And sorry, if my answer completly missed your problem.

type
  TForm61 = class(TForm)
    Button1: TButton;
    procedure Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

  IBase = interface
  ['{AE81FB3C-9159-45B0-A863-70FD1365C113}']
  end;

  IChild = interface(IBase)
  ['{515771E7-44F6-4819-9B3A-F2A2AFF74543}']
  end;

  TBase = class(TInterfacedObject, IBase)

  end;

  TChild = class(TInterfacedObject, IChild)

  end;

  TChildThatSupportsIbase = class(TChild, IBase)

  end;

var
  Form61: TForm61;

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

procedure TForm61.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  Child: IChild;
  ChildThatSupportsIbase: IChild;
begin
  Child := TChild.Create;
  ChildThatSupportsIbase:= TChildThatSupportsIbase.Create;
  if Supports(Child, IBase) then
    ShowMessage('TChild supports IBase')
  else
    ShowMessage('TChild doesn''t supports IBase');
  if Supports(ChildThatSupportsIbase, IBase) then
    ShowMessage('TChildThatSupportsIbase supports IBase')
  else
    ShowMessage('TChildThatSupportsIbase doesn''t supports IBase');
end;
share|improve this answer
    
I also suspect this is what's going on –  David Heffernan Jun 29 '11 at 17:06
3  
The COM stuff comes in from bugs in how COM queried for class factories IIRC, it would ask for the ancestor before it asked for the descendant, and if it got the ancestor it would happily use that rather than get the more derived interface. So for classes you need to specify every interface you support, rather than relying on interface inheritance, if you want Supports to do meaningful things. –  Barry Kelly Jun 29 '11 at 18:15
1  
+1 because (for me) it's something new and unexpected. It also means the OP's class hierarchy is not the one posted. –  Cosmin Prund Jun 29 '11 at 18:59
    
This is the reason why I avoid inheriting interfaces if at all possible. I'd forgotten the reason but I know that I shy away from ever doing it. –  David Heffernan Jun 29 '11 at 19:23
    
@Barry, just found an old transcript of Delphi 5 live chat link where Chuck Jazdzewski explains it as such: –  iamjoosy Jun 29 '11 at 22:22
show 3 more comments

Sample code edited to use your class hierarchy. Both Supports calls return True. I only added GUID's to your interfaces.


If my crystal ball is in working order, you forgot to give your interfaces GUID's.


Here's a proof that what I think you're asking works. If this is not what you're asking, take the hint and replace the code block with a short but complete console application that clearly displays the problem:

program Project29;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils;

type

  // This is the basic type
  IetCollectionItem = interface
  end;

  // Implementation of the basic type
  TetCollectionItem = class(TInterfacedObject, IetCollectionItem)
  end;

  ISomeBasicType = interface(IetCollectionItem)
  ['{F082CD83-5030-42EE-A1A8-FF91769F986F}']
  end;

  ISomeSpecificType1 = interface(ISomeBasicType)
  ['{8789FD5A-FC94-4F19-B28B-8ABA67D66DAE}']
  end;

  // Implements ISomeBasicType, should inherit implementation of IetCollectionItem
  // from TetCollectionItem
  TSomeBasicType = class(TetCollectionItem, ISomeBasicType)
  end;

  // Implements ISomeSpecificType1, should inherit implementation of ISomeBasicType
  // from TSomeBasicType and implementation of IetCollectionItem from
  // TetCollectionItem
  TSomeSpecificType1 = class(TSomeBasicType, ISomeSpecificType1)
  end;

var iBase: IetCollectionItem;

begin
  iBase := TSomeSpecificType1.Create;

  if Supports(iBase, iSomeBasicType) then
    WriteLn('iBase supports iSomeBasicType')
  else
    WriteLn('iBase does not support iSomeBasicType');

  if Supports(iBase, ISomeSpecificType1) then
    WriteLn('iBase supports ISomeSpecificType1')
  else
    WriteLn('iBase does not support ISomeSpecificType1');

  WriteLn('Press ENTER'); Readln;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, huh, the guess about GUIDs might be spot on. I bet since he's going to all these lengths to duplicate objects with interfaces he's crossing DLL boundaries. And Delphi generates different GUIDs on the other side. –  himself Jun 29 '11 at 15:12
    
@himself, @Angelos says he removed the GUID's for brevity, so that guess was wrong. –  Cosmin Prund Jun 29 '11 at 15:14
add comment

First you place something which clearly does NOT support ISomeSpecificType1 in the list:

 if Supports(aBaseType, ISomeSpecificType1, aSpecificType) then
  begin
    // Do something to the specific type
    aTypeCollection.Add(aSpecificType);
  end
  else
    aTypeCollection.Add(aBaseType); //<------- this

Then you wonder why it does not support ISomeSpecificType1.

What's the problem exactly? Why do you think all or even ANY of the items from the collection should support ISomeSpecificType1?

It could have been that every single item you have added did not support it.

share|improve this answer
    
I know for a fact that at least some items in the collection should support ISomeSpecificType1. –  Angelos Arampatzis Jun 29 '11 at 15:11
    
Remove this code block. Replace with "if Supports(...) aTypeCollection.Add() else do nothing". Test. If your list is empty, there - you have your problem. –  himself Jun 29 '11 at 15:16
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