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import java.util.*;

public class ABC {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> values = null;

        values = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        values.add(5);
        values.add(9);
        values.add(3);
        values.add(55);
        values.add(4);

        Collections.sort(values);
        System.out.println(values);



        values = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        values.add(5);
        values.add(9);
        values.add(3);
        values.add(55);
        values.add(4);

        Comparator<Integer> cmp = new Comparator<Integer>() {
                    @Override
                    public int compare(Integer o1, Integer o2) {
                        int o1i = o1;
                        int o2i = o2;
                        return o1i - o1i;
                    }
                };

        Collections.sort(values, cmp);
        System.out.println(values);
    }
}

This prints:

[3, 4, 5, 9, 55]
[5, 9, 3, 55, 4]

which is obviously not the expected result. What am I missing?

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1  
Your compare method always returns 0. –  Rachel Shallit Jun 29 '11 at 14:15
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have a bug:

Change

return o1i - o1i;

to

return o1i - o2i;
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Good eye you have. –  Neil Jun 29 '11 at 14:16
    
Thanks. and to think I've read it 3 times before submitting :) –  Maxim Veksler Jun 29 '11 at 14:17
1  
That's one of those great "clever programming tricks" that should only be used if you know what you're doing - and not at all for languages without an unsigned type (well for ints you can still cast to long which will work). Except it is intended that Integer.MAX_VALUE < Integer.MIN_VALUE :p Probably one of the most often seen bugs in custom comparators in java –  Voo Jun 29 '11 at 15:10
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Your comparator is subtracting o1i - o1i, giving you 0 each time.

(You aren't gaining anything by assigning o1 and o2 to local int variables either; just subtract o1 - o2.)

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That's mostly done to allow placing a breakpoint at the problematic line. –  Maxim Veksler Aug 8 '11 at 12:03
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You have a typing error, the comperator should have return o1i - o2i;

and not return o1i - o1i;

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return o1i - o1i;

I guess you meant;

return o1i - o2i;
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use this one

int o1i = o1;
                    int o2i = o2;
                    return o1i - o2i;

This gives following result

[3, 4, 5, 9, 55]

[3, 4, 5, 9, 55]

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