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Suppose I need to parse a binary file, which starts with three 4-byte magic numbers. Two of them are fixed strings. The other, however, is the length of the file.

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Data.Attoparsec
import Data.Attoparsec.Enumerator
import Data.Enumerator hiding (foldl, foldl', map, head)
import Data.Enumerator.Binary hiding (map)
import qualified Data.ByteString as S
import System

main = do
    f:_ <- getArgs
    eitherStat <- run (enumFile f $$ iterMagics)
    case eitherStat of
        Left _err -> putStrLn $ "Not a beam file: " ++ f
        Right _ -> return ()

iterMagics :: Monad m => Iteratee S.ByteString m ()
iterMagics = iterParser parseMagics

parseMagics :: Parser ()
parseMagics = do
    _ <- string "FOR1"
    len <- big_endians 4 -- need to compare with actual file length
    _ <- string "BEAM"
    return ()

big_endians :: Int -> Parser Int
big_endians n = do
    ws <- count n anyWord8
    return $ foldl1 (\a b -> a * 256 + b) $ map fromIntegral ws

If the stated length doesn't match the actual length, ideally iterMagics should return an error. But how? Is the only way to pass the actual length in as an argument? Is this the iteratee-ish way to do so? Not very incremental for me :)

share|improve this question
    
What is the program with passing the actual file length as an argument when initially generating an iterator? Maybe change your function iterMagics to take the file length as an argument. If you program smart, your code needs to pass the length just once. –  FUZxxl Jun 29 '11 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This can easily be done with enumeratees. First you read the three 4-byte magic numbers, then run an inner iteratee over the remainder. If you're using iteratee, it would look like more-or-less like this:

parseMagics :: Parser ()
parseMagics = do
    _ <- string "FOR1"
    len <- big_endians 4 -- need to compare with actual file length
    _ <- string "BEAM"
    return len

iterMagics :: Monad m => Iteratee S.ByteString m (Either String SomeResult)
iterMagics = do
  len <- iterParser parseMagics
  (result, bytesConsumed) <- joinI $ takeUpTo len (enumWith iterData I.length)
  if len == bytesConsumed
    then return $ Right result
    else return $ Left "Data too short"

In this case it won't throw an error if the file is too long, but it will stop reading. You can modify it to check for that condition fairly easily. I don't think Enumerator has an analog function to enumWith, so you'd probably need to count the bytes manually, but the same principle would apply.

Possibly a more pragmatic approach is to check the filesize before running the enumerator, and then just compare that to the value in the header. You'll need to either pass the filesize, or the filepath, as an argument to the iteratee (but not the parser).

import System.Posix

iterMagics2 filepath = do
  fsize <- liftIO . liftM fileSize $ getFileStatus filepath
  len <- iterParser parseMagics
share|improve this answer
    
nice. This is what I was looking for. –  edwardw Jun 29 '11 at 18:00

One solution you may prefere is just using two step parsing. Here we enumerate a file with a parser which takes the length from magic section of the file and returns a bytestring of length 'len'. It fails otherwise. After that we're using a regular attoparsec parser over that bytestring:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main where

import Data.Attoparsec
import Data.Attoparsec.Enumerator
import Data.Enumerator hiding (foldl, foldl', map, head)
import Data.Enumerator.Binary hiding (map)
import qualified Data.ByteString as S
import System

main = do
    f:_ <- getArgs
    eitherStat <- run (enumFile f $$ iterParser parseMagics)
    case eitherStat of
        Left _err -> putStrLn $ "Not a beam file: " ++ f
        Right bs -> parse parseContents bs

parseContents :: Parser ()
parseContents = do
  ...


parseMagics :: Parser ByteString
parseMagics = do
    _ <- string "FOR1"
    len <- big_endians 4
    _ <- string "BEAM"
    rest <- take len
    return rest

big_endians :: Int -> Parser Int
big_endians n = do
    ws <- count n anyWord8
    return $ foldl1 (\a b -> a * 256 + b) $ map fromIntegral ws
share|improve this answer
    
nice approach! what the performance implication of doing take len (might be quite long) and feeding it to next iteratee is, though? –  edwardw Jun 29 '11 at 15:53
    
Found another solution myself, attoparsec 0.8.x has ensure that fits the bill. But unfortunately 0.9.x removes such function. Wondering why. –  edwardw Jun 29 '11 at 17:09
    
@edwardw: doing take len in this manner is exactly equivalent to doing Data.ByteString.readFile. There's really no point to using an iteratee at all anymore. –  John L Jun 29 '11 at 17:42

Found one solution myself:

parseMagics :: Parser ()
parseMagics = do
    _ <- string "FOR1"
    len <- big_endians 4
    _ <- string "BEAM"
    return $ ensure len

But attoparsec removed ensure recently. I've filed a bug report to attoparsec author on bitbucket.

share|improve this answer
    
I think ensure was removed because this is exactly the sort of situation in which you wouldn't want to use it. ensure forces the next 'n' bytes of data, which means that if you're trying to ensure large values you completely negate any benefits of incremental parsing. –  John L Jun 29 '11 at 17:51
    
@John L, I suspect the same. Thanks for confirming it. –  edwardw Jun 29 '11 at 17:58

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