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    "INCLUDE Irvine32.inc
         .data
         source  BYTE  "Defense mechanism",0
         target  BYTE  SIZEOF source DUP(0)

    .code
        main PROC

              mov  esi, OFFSET target
                  mov  edi, OFFSET target
                  mov  ecx, SIZEOF source
    L1:
                  mov  al,[esi]           ; get a character from source
                  mov  [edi],al           ; store it in the target          
                  inc  esi      ; move to next character
                  inc  edi 
                  loop L1"

In the .data section, I see that source is defined as the string. In the .code section, I see that the memory location of "target" is stored in the source index. Shouldn't I want the source index (ESI) to point to "source" instead of "target"? This program is supposed to copy a string into the target box that has been initialized to the size of the source string and to have each of the fields filled with zeroes. I have no experience with Assembly language. What am I getting wrong? (Note: this is how my professor has the program listed out, but he isn't offering any real material on this because this is a web based "security in computing" course.

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4  
Yes, you're right - esi should point at source, not target - it looks like your "professor" has at least one bug in that code. –  Paul R Jun 29 '11 at 14:53
1  
@Paul R: that should be an answer, not a comment, imo –  Necrolis Jun 29 '11 at 16:00
    
@Necrolis: you may be right - it didn't feel substantial enough to be an answer but maybe it does qualify - I'll move it. –  Paul R Jun 29 '11 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

Yes, you're right - esi should point at source, not target - it looks like your professor has at least one bug in that code. Change:

          mov  esi, OFFSET target

to:

          mov  esi, OFFSET source
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