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Please have a look at demo code :

class myError
{
    const char* str;
public:
    myError():str(NULL) {}
    myError(const char* temp)
    {
        str = temp;
    }
    const char* what()
    {
        return str;
    }
};

class ab
{
    int x;
public:
    ab() try :x(0)
    {

            throw myError("error occured in the constructor of class ab");
    }
    catch(myError& temp)
    {
        std::cout<<"Handler no. 1 of ab constructor"<<std::endl;
    }
};

int main () try
{
    ab bb;
    cout << "Resumed execution!" << endl;
    return 0;
}
catch(myError& temp)
{
    std::cout<<"Handler below the main function"<<std::endl;
    std::cout<<"And the error is :" <<temp.what();
}

My Questions :

  1. Why only function try block's handler of ctor and dtor only rethows the exception? ,

and when you simply throw exception inside ctor , its handler doesn't rethrows the object? i.e

Ctor::Ctor()
{
    try{
        throw Excep1();
    }
    catch(Excep1& temp) { 
        std::cout<<"Doesn't rethrows the exception object";
    }
}
  1. I wanna know that how to resume the control back to cout << "Resumed execution!" << endl; , after handling rethrown object?

  2. why is it often said that we shouldn't place function try block on dtor of base class?

share|improve this question
    
by dtor, do you mean destructor? –  MGZero Jun 29 '11 at 15:38
    
@ MGZero : yes) –  Mr.Anubis Jun 29 '11 at 15:50
    
I can't see rethrow in your code at all. You are just catching the exceptions. –  VestniK Jun 29 '11 at 15:58
    
@VestniK Like Mr.Anubis states in the question, the constructors and destructors automatically rethrow if you use a function try block. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 29 '11 at 16:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The usual rule is that a catch block doesn't rethrow unless you ask it to. How would you stop the exception from propagating otherwise. In the case of a constructor, however, if something in the initialization list throws, then you haven't got a fully constructed object; there is nothing you could do with the object, not even call the destructor on it. And if the function catch block of the constructor doesn't rethrow, what is it going to do, since it cannot simply return (and leave the variable on the stack)?

In all other cases, it's up do the function containing the catch block to know what to do. In the case of your main, for example, you could write: try { ab bb; } catch (...) { } std::cout << "Resumed execution!" << std::endl;

What you can't do is execute code where bb would be in scope and accessible, but not have been correctly constructed.

As for why you shouldn't place a function try block on the destructor of a base class, I've never heard that rule. In general, destructors shouldn't throw, so there's no point in wrapping them in a try block, period.

share|improve this answer
    
refering to your last para : can you please tell why shouldn't dtor of base class throw exception ? , Thanks –  Mr.Anubis Jun 29 '11 at 15:48
    
@MrAnubis: destructors shouldn't throw because they are called when an exception occurs and the stack is unwound. So, if you have an exception, and then a dtor is called that throws an exception, you just have an exception thrown, while another was being thrown. Bad things happen (terminate() gets called, I think). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 29 '11 at 15:57
    
thanks for such a nice explanation . –  Mr.Anubis Jun 29 '11 at 17:24

For the second question, destructors shouldn't be throwing period. Consider a case where your destructor is freeing a lot of memory through delete. What would happen if your destructor threw an error before finishing the clean up? You now have a memory leak. If your destructor is causing a runtime error, then you probably have problems elsewhere in your code that you need to fix.

share|improve this answer

As usually, Herb Sutter knows and explains everything:

If the handler body contained the statement "throw;" then the catch block would obviously rethrow whatever exception A::A() or B::B() had emitted. What's less obvious, but clearly stated in the standard, is that if the catch block does not throw (either rethrow the original exception, or throw something new), and control reaches the end of the catch block of a constructor or destructor, then the original exception is automatically rethrown.

More in his article

share|improve this answer

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