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I have the following code:

public abstract class BaseController : Controller
{
    public IUserService UserService { get; set; }
}

All my controllers inherit from this base controller. I started out by configuring it in Ninject using the following code:

kernel.Bind<BaseController>()
      .ToSelf()
      .WithPropertyValue("UserService", x => x.Kernel.GetService(typeof(IUserService)));

This did not work. I assume it is because of the fact that the BaseController is an abstract class (please confirm my assumption). So I moved on to modify the configuration to:

kernel.Bind<HomeController>()
      .ToSelf()
      .WithPropertyValue("UserService", x => x.Kernel.GetService(typeof(IUserService)));

This does work. The minor downside is that I now have to configure every controller the same way.

Since I also have DependencyResolver setup in my ASP.NET MVC 3 project I could also remove the above Ninject configuration and modify my base controller to look like:

    public IUserService UserService
    {
        get
        {
            return DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IUserService>();
        }
    }

Is there any benefit to using the fluent configuration as opposed to using the DependencyResolver approach? Is one better than the other? Which approach would be considered a better practice?

It is worth mentioning that I did not want to do constructor injection in my base controller.

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1  
Hasn't this question already been asked and answered in Property Injection in Base Controller using Ninject 2, albeit in a slightly different form. –  mrydengren Jun 29 '11 at 16:23
    
This question involves the DependencyResolver in MVC 3 which the previous one did not. The question is also which is the better approach as opposed to how do you do that. –  Thomas Jun 29 '11 at 20:01
    
MVC3/DependencyResolver changes absolutely nothing –  Remo Gloor Jun 29 '11 at 23:34
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A better practice in MVC it is to use constructor injection over property injection. Why did you make your choice like this ?

Using Constructor Injection you states that all dependencies in constructor are necessary for the class to do its job.

Property injection means that the dependencies are optional or that there are the local defaults implementations, so all will work even if you don't provide necessary implementations yourself.

You should really know what you're doing using Property injection or you have no other choice, so the safer approach is to rely on constructor injection.

Now I'll give you my point of view. Other may have other opinions.

DependencyResolver was introduced in MVC 3 for "convenient" service location but for me it's a regular Service locator which for me is also an anti-pattern http://blog.ploeh.dk/2010/02/03/ServiceLocatorIsAnAntiPattern.aspx. I don't use it because I don't like it and there is no benefit in using it. I prefer to user my controller factory like before and pass the dependencies through constructor.

More the IDependencyResolver has somme issues with some IoC containers (I don't know if it's the case with Ninject). You can read more here : http://mikehadlow.blogspot.com/2011/02/mvc-30-idependencyresolver-interface-is.html

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If you need the same dependency in each controller then there seems to be something wrong in your design. Most likely you are handling some kind of cross cutting concern in your base controller. In this case Doing property injection is just treating sympthoms instead of cureing the disease. This should rather be handled by an aspect (e.g. a filter or an interceptor) so that you do not have to pollute your controller with something that does not belong there.

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There are many ways to skin the cat they say. You could use conventions-based bindings with .WithPropertyValue() or with .OnActivaction() (as described here).

public class ControllerModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        // Get all controller types derived from the base controller.
        IEnumerable<Type> controllerTypes = // ...
        foreach (var controllerType in controllerTypes)
        {
            Bind(controllerType).ToSelf().InRequestScope()
                .WithPropertyValue(...);
        }
    }
 }

You could create your own custom implementation of the IInjectionHeuristic interface as described here or your own custom implementation of the IControllerActivator interface.

public class CustomNinjectControllerActivator : IControllerActivator
{
    private readonly IKernel kernel;

    public CustomNinjectControllerActivator(IKernel kernel)
    {
        this.kernel = kernel;
    }

    public IController Create(RequestContext context, Type controllerType)
    {
        var baseController = kernel.TryGet(controllerType) as BaseController;
        if (baseController == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        baseController.UserService = kernel.Get<IUserService>();
        return baseController;
    }
}

Heck, you could even use the service locator pattern if you are comfortable using it.

public IUserService UserService
{
    get { return DependencyResolver.Current.GetService<IUserService>(); }
}

You should choose whichever solution is easiest to implement, test and maintain, and of course provides the desired behavior.

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Is there one approach that is considered more "correct"? I can implement any one of those and it will work and do what it needs to do but which one is the most correct way? –  Thomas Jul 1 '11 at 15:02
    
I would say that the correct one is the one that provides the least effort. In this case, most likely the custom controller activator or the service locator (the dependency locator). But as @Remo Gloor has pointed out you might want to stay clear of this kind of architecture altogether. –  mrydengren Jul 1 '11 at 18:11
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