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I have the following test script

 /^[^a-zA-Z0-9]/  {
    DATEd[$3] = $1
    } 
   END { 
        print "        \"data\": ["
        for (i = 0 ; i <= 5; i ++ ) {
            { print "            [" i ", \"" DATEd[i] "\"],"}
        }
        print "        ]"
}

And are reading from this text file

2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399
2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399 
2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399 
2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399
2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399 
2011-01-22 22:12 P16A22_110114072915 22 1312 75 13.55 1399

But it doesn't print out what I want it to, I want it to print out

    "data": [
        [0, "2011-01-22"],
        [1, "2011-01-22"],
        [2, "2011-01-22"],
        [3, "2011-01-22"],
        [4, "2011-01-22"],
        [5, "2011-01-22"],
    ]

When it in fact are only printing out

"data": [
    [0, ""],
    [1, ""],
    [2, ""],
    [3, ""],
    [4, ""],
    [5, ""],
]

So why is "DATEd[$3] = $1" empty?

Also how do I check the length of an array? DATEd.length doesn't work in this case.

Thanks

EDIT_______________________________________________

So from the help of @Fredrik and @geekosaur I have come somewhere with this, now to some last questions

1) The script now looks like this

 /[a-zA-Z0-9]/  {
    DATEd[NR-1] = $1
    } 
   END { 
        print "        \"data\": ["

        for (i in DATEd) {
            { print "            [" i ", \"" DATEd[i] "\"],"}
        }
        print "        ]"
}

And gives the following output

"data": [
    [4, "2011-01-26"],
    [5, "2011-01-27"],
    [6, "2011-01-28"],
    [0, "2011-01-22"],
    [1, "2011-01-23"],
    [2, "2011-01-24"],
    [3, "2011-01-25"],
]

But I want it to look like this

"data": [
[0, "2011-01-22"],
[1, "2011-01-23"],
[2, "2011-01-24"],
[3, "2011-01-25"],
[4, "2011-01-26"],
[5, "2011-01-27"],
[6, "2011-01-28"]
]

I.E be sorted and removing the last ',' character before the final closing ']' character. Is this possible to accieve in a easy way? =)

Thanks =)

EDIT 3 Final Outcome_______________________________________

Used a combination of @geekosaur and @Fredrik contribution's =)

{
    DATEd[NR-1] = $1; len++
}
   END { 
        print "        \"data\": ["

        #for (i in DATEd) {
        for (i = 0 ; i <= len-1; i ++ ) {
            { print "            [" i ", \"" DATEd[i] "\"],"}
        }
        print "        ]"
}
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As a start, your regex is wrong, /^[^a-zA-Z0-9]/ means to match the start of a line and NOT followed by a letter or a number. None of the lines have that setup, hence, your array DATe is empty.

Secondly, your array is not indexed by 0-5 but instead the content of $3 (if you fix your regex)

There is no built in function to get the length of an array, but it's simple to implement one.

Array example

function array_length(a) {
    for (i in a) n++
    return n
}

{
    DATEd[NR] = $1
}
END {
    for (i in DATEd) {
        print i, DATEd[i]
    }
    print "Number of items", array_length(DATEd)

    # copy indices
    j = 1
    for (i in DATEd) {
        ind[j] = i    # index value becomes element value
        j++
    }
    n = asort(ind)    # index values are now sorted
    for (i = 1; i <= n; i++)
        print i, DATEd[ind[i]]
}

Gives:

4 2011-01-22
5 2011-01-22
6 2011-01-22
1 2011-01-22
2 2011-01-22
3 2011-01-22
Number of items 6
1 2011-01-22
2 2011-01-22
3 2011-01-22
4 2011-01-22
5 2011-01-22
6 2011-01-22

See the gnu awk manual for an description of arrays

Too loop through all elements of an array, use this construct (see link above)

 for (var in array)
   body
share|improve this answer
    
@Fredrik I know that it isn't indexed to 5, was just curious to see if it were containing anything. But I have fixed it now, but it still doesn't work, it is like this now /[a-zA-Z0-9]/, and that must work? –  erik Jun 29 '11 at 16:15
    
@erik see answer from @geekosaur you are indexing your array using the 3rd field i.e. P16A22_110114072915 is this intended? –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 29 '11 at 16:20
    
Quite effective, one more question, is there a way that perhaps removes the last ',' to, like check the lenght of $1 and if it is the same have a special case printf "[%d, %s]\n", NR-1, $1 ? =) –  erik Jun 29 '11 at 16:27
    
@erik can you update your question with the above including expected output? I don't quite understand :-) –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 29 '11 at 16:34
    
@Fredrik Done =) –  erik Jun 29 '11 at 16:40
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In the absence of an -F option, $3 will be P16A22_110114072915 (or would be if your selector regex were correct). What value do you actually want there? Do you perhaps want NR?

awk is not object oriented; and its array support is, to be kind, lacking. You'll need to track the length of the array yourself. (Just to give you an idea of how limited awk's array support is: you can't assign an array. You have to assign individual indexes or use split().)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah thats the one :D Another question, Now to the other question, how to I keep track of the length of this array, it is like this now DATEd[NR-1] = $1 =) –  erik Jun 29 '11 at 16:33
    
You could refer to NR in the END block, or just keep a counter: DATEd[NR-1] = $1; len++ and then use len in the END block. Alternately, you could use a for i in DATEd block, but the result will be "randomly" ordered. (Awk doesn't really have arrays, it has hashes/dicts. for ... in orders by the hash value.) –  geekosaur Jun 29 '11 at 16:42
    
Thanks for the help =) –  erik Jun 29 '11 at 17:06
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