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In my game Bitfighter, I have a class called AbstractTeam that has two subclasses: Team and EditorTeam. They share many methods, but Team tracks spawn points (implementing addSpawn() and getSpawns() methods), whereas EditorTeam does not care at all about spawn points.

There are two designs I can see for implementing this:

  1. I could implement addSpawn() and getSpawns() in Team but not in EditorTeam, then when I have an AbstractTeam, I could cast it to Team before accessing the methods.

  2. I could implement addSpawn() and getSpawns() in AbstractTeam, making them do nothing, then override those in Team. That would eliminate the need for a cast, but would suggest that EditorTeam somehow cared about spawns, because it would now have the two (dummy) methods.

So my question is which is better?

The code is in C++, and I can provide some samples if the above is not clear.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use number 1. That's what dynamic_cast is for. You definitely should not define members in your base class that all derived classes will not implement.

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Though I would argue that, if the rest of the program is well designed, this should almost never be used. Functionality that requires a Team to work, should not have an interface that accepts an AbstractTeam (although I admit that this is not always possible, or the tradeoff just becomes to bad). –  Björn Pollex Jun 29 '11 at 19:58
    
@Space_C0wb0y: Oh, I agree. But that part is the OP's problem- he came down to #1 vs #2. –  Puppy Jun 29 '11 at 20:01
    
I have another object that tracks teams, and, in order to handle both Team and EditorTeam, it doles out AbstractTeams. Since this is my primary way of getting a Team to operate on, I end up casting fairly often when I need a Team-specific method. –  Watusimoto Jun 29 '11 at 20:23
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There is another option which you may think of. If you see Teams as Teams associated with a bunch of abilities like e.g. the ability to handle spawns. And abilities register with Teams. So you are able to work with your team the whole time and only proove if they have abilities available.

How this registration design will look like (e.g. dependency injection or whatever) is another thing.

In matters of a game it is always the case that teams, players or other data structures will evolve over time so its more convenient to pack things not in a very static class hierarchy in order to be more flexible. It will result in a less complex model which leads to less pain in the end.

To your question. I would prefer the first one if im limited to these two options because i dont want to have a class which holds tons of methods which i actually dont need in every subclass. And happily you dont have to cast subclasses to parent classes in order to put them into a collection.

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I like this idea, but it is not suitable for this particular problem. However, I can think of some other places this might be useful! –  Watusimoto Jun 30 '11 at 6:09
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Have a virtual method in your AbstractTeam class.

public interface ISpawn
{
  void Spawn1();
  void Spawn2();
}

public class Team : AbstractTeam, ISpawn
{
  // implement ISpawn and AbstracTeam in here...
}

public class EditorTeam : AbstractTeam
{
  // implement AbstracTeam in here...
}

// usage....
ISpawn team = getSpawn();
if(team != null)
{
   team.Spawn1();
   team.Spawn2();
}
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This lets me avoid the cast, but doesn't it imply that SpawnMethod1() is something you might want to call on EditorTeam? –  Watusimoto Jun 29 '11 at 18:11
    
@Watusimoto How about this way? –  zbugs Jun 29 '11 at 19:27
2  
Unless I'm mistaken, that code is most definitely not C++. –  Puppy Jun 29 '11 at 19:39
1  
I never said that this was C++. Language is just a tool. The underlying design would be the same. This is in C# and it makes no difference. –  zbugs Jun 29 '11 at 19:58
    
@zbugs: I think you will find that the OP tagged C++, and he specifically said he was in C++, so it's not unreasonable to ask people to post C++ if they choose to post code. –  Puppy Jun 29 '11 at 20:08
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the question you should be asking yourself is; do i need the add/getSpawn functionality in any other place than the Team class? if no, then leave it there

if yes, then move that functionality in some AbstractSpawnListenerTeam class (ideally it should not implement AbstractTeam) and make team inherit from it (as well as implementing AbstractTeam)

if you want to reuse the spawning functionality, composition is a lot better than inheritance. Leave inheritance only for the part of wrapping implementations of actual interfaces

if you want to do it with inheritance, keep in mind that as in other languages, multiple inheritance in c++ is safe as long as you inherit from at most one implementation (AbstractSpawnListenerTeam) and from one or more interfaces

if you absolutely need to have one inheritance path, make AbstractSpawnListenerTeam implement AbstractTeam but leave all the virtual methods = 0

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While I get your point, I wish you would be a little more careful about the terminology, as this question is tagged C++. There are no interfaces, and you cannot implement. You can only inherit from abstract base classes. –  Björn Pollex Jun 29 '11 at 19:57
    
yes, but one thing is the language technical terminology about how to implement a certain design element, and other is the design element itself. As you correctly assert, the way to create interfaces in c++ is by writing a class where all methods are virtual and declared pure, blablabla –  lurscher Jun 29 '11 at 20:00
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i had a similar question

Testing a c++ class for features

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There's a third option you might want to consider. If keeping track of spawn points is truly something separate from the idea of an AbstractTeam, you could pull it out of that class hierarchy altogether.

One way would be to have Team inherit from an interface class, like so:

class ISpawnTracker
{
public:
    Point SpawnPoint()=0;
};

class Team : public ISpawnTracker, public AbstractTeam
{
    Point SpawnPoint()
    {
        // ...
    }
};

This lets you conditionally call methods on it by doing a dynamic_cast<ISpawnTracker> and testing for NULL.

Another way would be to break spawn-point tracking into its own class, and inject one when the object is created; the Team class now uses the SpawnTracker class to do the spawn-point tracking for it, and EditorTeam doesn't have to know about it at all:

class ISpawnTracker
{
public:
    void TrackSpawnPoints()=0;
};

class ConcreteSpawnTracker : public ISpawnTracker { /* ... */ };
class TestingSpawnTracker : public ISpawnTracker { /* ... */ };



class Team : AbstractTeam
{
public:
    Team(ISpawnTracker *spawnTracker)
        : mSpawnTracker(spawnTracker)
    { /* ... */ }

private:
    ISpawnTracker mSpawnTracker;
};

This last approach has the side benefit of making both Team and ConcreteSpawnTracker more easily unit-testable,

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Your 1st method still requires a cast, and, in my situation offers no additional benefits over my 1st proposal. When I ask my primary game object for a list of teams, it returns a list of AbstractTeams, but I know by the context (if I'm in the editor or in a game) whether they will be EditorTeams or Teams. Therefore I don't need to test them -- I can cast blindly and be sure what I'll get. I understand your 2nd proposal a little less, but I think I'll still need to cast, and while it might be good in a more complex scenario, it seems a bit overkill for my purposes. But thanks for the ideas! –  Watusimoto Jun 29 '11 at 20:47
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