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public class FooDataRepository
{
    private MyServiceReferenceClient Client { get; set; }

    public void FooClass()
    {
        Client = new MyServiceReferenceClient();
        Client.SaveFooCompleted += Client_SaveFooCompleted;
        Client.SaveBarCompleted += Client_SaveBarCompleted;
    }

    private void Client_SaveFooCompleted(Object sender, EventArgs e) { ... }

    private void Client_SaveBarCompleted(Object sender, EventArgs e) { ... }

    public void SaveFoo(Foo foo)
    {
        Client.SaveFooAsync(foo);

        foreach (var bar in foo.Bars)
            Client.SaveBarAsync(bar);
    }

}

I want to do something within the FooDataRepository class once the SaveFooAsync and the all the SaveBarAsync methods have completed. Is there a standard pattern for trying to do a single thing based upon N number of Async calls completing?

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It's much easier if you have access to the non-async methods (e.g. SaveFoo() and SaveBar()). Do you? –  Pat Jun 30 '11 at 19:40
    
If you want a sufficient answer for your case, you're going to have to provide more information. I don't believe that there exists a "standard pattern" for what you're describing, but Tasks would be the closest answer. –  Pat Jul 1 '11 at 14:43
    
Yes, there are non-async methods created when you generate a service reference, however, the entire point of async is to not have a large waiting block for heavy calls. I want to be able to update the user in real time as the foo is saved and each bar is saved. –  michael Jul 1 '11 at 19:48
    
I understand the point of performing operations asynchronously. The reason I asked about the non-async methods is that it is easier to just use Tasks with the non-async methods than it is to use the generated EAP async methods. –  Pat Jul 11 '11 at 14:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use TaskFactory.ContinueWhenAll to schedule a code to run when all tasks have completed.

Task[] tasks = new Task[3]
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodA()),
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodB()),
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodC())
};

//This will not block.
Task.Factory.ContinueWhenAll(tasks, completedTasks => { RunSomeMethod(); });

EDIT:

Regarding your question about composing async method calls with tasks if the class has Begin/End methods for calling the method in an async way you can use Task.FromAsync

Alternatively you can also use Rx for calling several methods asynchronously and then observing when all of them have completed. Have a look at this question: Can I shortcut the Begin/End async pattern by using an event to create my AsyncResult? (C# .Net 3.5, WCF)

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Can you show the example in the context of my example? The reason I ask is because I don't see this working... the methods I'm calling are Async, which means they'll state "completed" right away instead of actually waiting until their callbacks are called. When the callbacks are called the original call is "completed" ... –  michael Jun 29 '11 at 17:08
    
@michael - See my updated answer. –  Giorgi Jun 29 '11 at 17:54

If you can, use Tasks and then do Task.WaitAll. E.g.:

Task[] tasks = new Task[3]
{
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodA()),
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodB()),
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() => MethodC())
};

//Block until all tasks complete.
Task.WaitAll(tasks);

// Continue on this thread...

If you don't have access to the synchronous methods, you can use a method like the one described at Tasks and the Event-based Asynchronous Pattern to convert your EAP library into one that uses tasks. Alternately, Rx provides several ways to deal with this issue.

Basically, the best practice advice is to use Tasks if you can. If your application requires more fine-grained control, look seriously into Rx - it provides LINQ filtering for events and async methods.

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I don't know how "standard" my idea is, but I have just recently started using some asynchronous calls with WCF Data Services and Silverlight. In some cases we have collections that are very similar to the "collections" exposed by the Repository pattern. We issue a query to get the items from a WCF Data Service, but then each item that is returned must be "loaded" in turn (i.e. each item has a Load method that executes asynchronously and might eventually issue its own WCF Data Service query). During all of this loading, any of our gui that depends on that data being loaded (certain tabs) is "blocked" (progress indicator is displayed) until it is loaded. In some cases, we have to load two collections because one has a relationship to the other. We are using a callback pattern with the WCF Data Service, so after each of the callbacks (when loading multiple collections) has been called, we know that our "loading" task is complete.

So, applying our pattern to your case would yield something like this (rough pseudocode using your sample code as a starting point)

public class FooDataRepository 
{
     bool fooCompleted = false;
     bool barCompleted = false;
     int barsSaved = 0;
     int barCount = 0;

     private MyServiceReferenceClient Client { get; set; }
     public void FooClass()
     {
         Client = new MyServiceReferenceClient();
         Client.SaveFooCompleted += Client_SaveFooCompleted;
         Client.SaveBarCompleted += Client_SaveBarCompleted;
     }

     private void Client_SaveFooCompleted(Object sender, EventArgs e) 
     {
       fooCompleted = true;
       if (barCompleted)
       {
         SaveCompleted();
       }
     }

     private void Client_SaveBarCompleted(Object sender, EventArgs e) 
     {
       Interlocked.Increment(barsSaved);
       barCompleted = barsSaved == barCount;
       if (fooCompleted)
       {
         SaveCompleted();
       }
     }

     private void SaveCompleted()
     {
       //Do whatever you want to do when foo and all bars have been saved
     }

     public void SaveFoo(Foo foo)
     {
        fooCompleted = barCompleted = false;
        barCount = foo.Bars.Count;
        barsSaved = 0;

        Client.SaveFooAsync(foo);
        foreach (var bar in foo.Bars)
            Client.SaveBarAsync(bar);
     }
 } 

To be honest, I'm not sure if this is a "good" pattern or not. These calls are async and have a callback/event that is called/raised when the work is finished. This pattern does work well enough for us to turn off our progress bar when all data has been loaded.

I haven't used Tasks much and have not used Rx at all, so I don't know how they apply or not to this problem.

Good luck!

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