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I've got some css code styling a textbox like this:

input#address
{
   border: 1px solid #dbdbdb;
}

I want to show a red border around that textbox if there's a validation error, so I also have this class:

.error
{
   border: 1px solid red;
}

And I add this class to the textbox element using JavaScript if there's an error. However it seems that the browser disregards this class because of the earlier code assigning a different border to the textbox. How do I solve this?

Also, I'd like to keep .error as a reusable class which can be used on other elements while solving this issue.

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see also: CSS Specificity: Things You Should Know –  Brad Mace Jun 29 '11 at 16:45
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try adding !important to the error rule, it's not specific enough otherwise and gets overridden by the very specific input#address.

.error
{
   border: 1px solid red !important;
}
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Will this work with most browsers? –  Click Upvote Jun 29 '11 at 16:45
    
It should do, it's how CSS is designed to work so you should only see issues with very old browsers with poor css support. Things like IE5 Mac and the Blackberry browser from < v4.6 might be an issue. –  shanethehat Jun 29 '11 at 16:47
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While @shanethehat is correct, in that it's the specificity of the selector that's the problem, please don't use !important, instead try improving your selector:

input#address.error {
    border-color: #f00;
}

The reason I plead with people not to use !important is because that class will subsequently override any and every other style subsequently applied to that element. In the case of an error message that's perhaps what you want (and in which case !important is useful), but if you, or any developer that follows you, ever have to debug the persistent red border that keeps showing up, despite needing the border to now be green, !important causes delays and irritation. And removing it generally causes other problems.

It's almost always not necessary, though, when it is, it's very useful and powerful.


Edited in response to comment from @shanethehat (in comments, below):

He says he wants to use the same rule for other elements, so I prefer to use !important rather than maintain a potentially long list of specific identifiers. Especially if the form is going to contain dynamic fields.

This is true, of course. And I added a qualifier in my previous edit ("...that class will subsequently override any and every other style subsequently applied to that element. In the case of an error message that's perhaps what you want (and in which case !important is useful)...").

However, rather than forcing this over-riding behaviour with !important it's possible to increase the specificity of the selector by looking at its ancestors:

form#FormID fieldset input[type=text].error {...}

Or decrease the specificity of the original selector:

input[name=address]
/* or, assuming that the address field is of type="text" but, obviously, "textarea" can be substituted
input[type=text]
*/

The above two selectors do though rely upon attribute-equals selector compatibility, which isn't (so far as I know) reliably present in IE (until the passing of the final IE6, anyway), so this latter otion may cause you some problems.

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2  
He says he wants to use the same rule for other elements, so I prefer to use !important rather than maintain a potentially long list of specific identifiers. Especially if the form is going to contain dynamic fields. But yes, for one field it is better to be specific than to use the important override. –  shanethehat Jun 29 '11 at 16:48
1  
@David - Does this mean that every input#<ID> will need a .error defined? If so then this means the developer/designer will have to remember to set this every time. Or I am missing something here? –  Rippo Jun 29 '11 at 16:51
    
Incidental David, I'm not responsible for any downvoting here. I fully agree with reducing the use of !important, but I feel this is one of the occasions when it is justified. –  shanethehat Jun 29 '11 at 16:55
    
@shane, I've tried to address your original comment in an edit to the answer. Though while I do, largely, agree with your use of !important (in this very specific case), I prefer to discourage its use. At least until the pit-falls are known or made explicit. –  David Thomas Jun 29 '11 at 16:58
    
@Rippo, in the original answer, yes, it would. Which may be addressed in the edit (using alternative selectors rather than using an id-based selector for every possible field). –  David Thomas Jun 29 '11 at 16:59
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Your first rule uses a id (#address) and therefore is more specific than your second rule which only uses a class. So the first rule is the one used.

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The problem here is specificity.

Your input#address selector is more specific than the .error selector, as it affects a narrower set of elements.

The way to get round this is to modify your .error CSS to be:

border: 1px solid red !important;
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I believe assigning a border as an ID and a Class will cause some problems, as you've found (and others have mentioned). Off the top of my head, instead of assigning the .error class via javascript, you could also directly change the style

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just saw you want to reuse the .error class, so this won't be much help –  steve Jun 29 '11 at 16:55
    
-1 since you knew other people had given this answer and had nothing more to add –  Brad Mace Jun 29 '11 at 16:57
    
@bemace thanks for the explanation, I was wondering why I got that -1. I think @click's note about wanting to reuse the class was edited in after I posted this answer - or else I just didn't see it - and in if he was only wanting to do it once or twice, I think my method would have been a quick fix –  steve Jun 29 '11 at 17:05
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Either

input#address.error {}

or input#error {}

What you really should do is style the input using a class.

Then you can reuse .error more easily, because it won't have to fight with the #id selector for specificity.

input.address {} input.address.error {}

I'd recommend making a more generic class for the input, so you can apply it to any textfield and still have it make sense.

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It might be a class interfering with it. Take a look at this example on on fiddle

<input id="mytextbox" class="something error" />
<input id="mytextox2" class=" error something" />
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