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I'm looking for the fastest way to get pixel data (int the form int[][]) from a BufferedImage. My goal is to be able to address pixel (x, y) from the image using int[x][y]. All the methods I have found do not do this (most of them return int[]s).

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If you're worried about speed, why do you want to copy the entire image to an array instead of just using getRGB and setRGB directly? –  Brad Mace Jun 29 '11 at 16:53
    
@bemace: Because those methods appear to do more work than one might think, according to my profiling. Accessing an array seems way faster. –  ryyst Jun 29 '11 at 16:56
    
ah, you actually profiled. That puts you ahead of a lot of askers. I looked at the source and they do indeed interact with the underlying ColorModel (which stores as four separate values) as well as the Raster. I think tskuzzy's option is probably the only alternative then. –  Brad Mace Jun 29 '11 at 17:05
5  
@bemace: It's actually really intense: using an array is more than 800% faster than using getRGB and setRGB directly. –  ryyst Jun 29 '11 at 17:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 54 down vote accepted

I was just playing around with this same subject, which is the fastest way to access the pixels. I currently know of two ways for doing this:

  1. Using BufferedImage's getRGB() method as described in @tskuzzy's answer.
  2. By accessing the pixels array directly using:

    byte[] pixels = ((DataBufferByte) bufferedImage.getRaster().getDataBuffer()).getData();
    

If you are working with large images and performance is an issue, the first method is absolutely not the way to go. The getRGB() method combines the alpha, red, green and blue values into one int and then returns the result, which in most cases you'll do the reverse to get these values back.

The second method will return the red, green and blue values directly for each pixel, and if there is an alpha channel it will add the alpha value. Using this method is harder in terms of calculating indices, but is much faster than the first approach.

In my application I was able to reduce the time of processing the pixels by more than 90% by just switching from the first approach to the second!

Here is a comparison I've setup to compare the two approaches:

import java.awt.image.BufferedImage;
import java.awt.image.DataBufferByte;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.imageio.ImageIO;

public class PerformanceTest {

   public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

      BufferedImage hugeImage = ImageIO.read(PerformanceTest.class.getResource("12000X12000.jpg"));

      System.out.println("Testing convertTo2DUsingGetRGB:");
      for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
         long startTime = System.nanoTime();
         int[][] result = convertTo2DUsingGetRGB(hugeImage);
         long endTime = System.nanoTime();
         System.out.println(String.format("%-2d: %s", (i + 1), toString(endTime - startTime)));
      }

      System.out.println("");

      System.out.println("Testing convertTo2DWithoutUsingGetRGB:");
      for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
         long startTime = System.nanoTime();
         int[][] result = convertTo2DWithoutUsingGetRGB(hugeImage);
         long endTime = System.nanoTime();
         System.out.println(String.format("%-2d: %s", (i + 1), toString(endTime - startTime)));
      }
   }

   private static int[][] convertTo2DUsingGetRGB(BufferedImage image) {
      int width = image.getWidth();
      int height = image.getHeight();
      int[][] result = new int[height][width];

      for (int row = 0; row < height; row++) {
         for (int col = 0; col < width; col++) {
            result[row][col] = image.getRGB(col, row);
         }
      }

      return result;
   }

   private static int[][] convertTo2DWithoutUsingGetRGB(BufferedImage image) {

      final byte[] pixels = ((DataBufferByte) image.getRaster().getDataBuffer()).getData();
      final int width = image.getWidth();
      final int height = image.getHeight();
      final boolean hasAlphaChannel = image.getAlphaRaster() != null;

      int[][] result = new int[height][width];
      if (hasAlphaChannel) {
         final int pixelLength = 4;
         for (int pixel = 0, row = 0, col = 0; pixel < pixels.length; pixel += pixelLength) {
            int argb = 0;
            argb += (((int) pixels[pixel] & 0xff) << 24); // alpha
            argb += ((int) pixels[pixel + 1] & 0xff); // blue
            argb += (((int) pixels[pixel + 2] & 0xff) << 8); // green
            argb += (((int) pixels[pixel + 3] & 0xff) << 16); // red
            result[row][col] = argb;
            col++;
            if (col == width) {
               col = 0;
               row++;
            }
         }
      } else {
         final int pixelLength = 3;
         for (int pixel = 0, row = 0, col = 0; pixel < pixels.length; pixel += pixelLength) {
            int argb = 0;
            argb += -16777216; // 255 alpha
            argb += ((int) pixels[pixel] & 0xff); // blue
            argb += (((int) pixels[pixel + 1] & 0xff) << 8); // green
            argb += (((int) pixels[pixel + 2] & 0xff) << 16); // red
            result[row][col] = argb;
            col++;
            if (col == width) {
               col = 0;
               row++;
            }
         }
      }

      return result;
   }

   private static String toString(long nanoSecs) {
      int minutes    = (int) (nanoSecs / 60000000000.0);
      int seconds    = (int) (nanoSecs / 1000000000.0)  - (minutes * 60);
      int millisecs  = (int) ( ((nanoSecs / 1000000000.0) - (seconds + minutes * 60)) * 1000);


      if (minutes == 0 && seconds == 0)
         return millisecs + "ms";
      else if (minutes == 0 && millisecs == 0)
         return seconds + "s";
      else if (seconds == 0 && millisecs == 0)
         return minutes + "min";
      else if (minutes == 0)
         return seconds + "s " + millisecs + "ms";
      else if (seconds == 0)
         return minutes + "min " + millisecs + "ms";
      else if (millisecs == 0)
         return minutes + "min " + seconds + "s";

      return minutes + "min " + seconds + "s " + millisecs + "ms";
   }
}

Can you guess the output? ;)

Testing convertTo2DUsingGetRGB:
1 : 16s 911ms
2 : 16s 730ms
3 : 16s 512ms
4 : 16s 476ms
5 : 16s 503ms
6 : 16s 683ms
7 : 16s 477ms
8 : 16s 373ms
9 : 16s 367ms
10: 16s 446ms

Testing convertTo2DWithoutUsingGetRGB:
1 : 1s 487ms
2 : 1s 940ms
3 : 1s 785ms
4 : 1s 848ms
5 : 1s 624ms
6 : 2s 13ms
7 : 1s 968ms
8 : 1s 864ms
9 : 1s 673ms
10: 2s 86ms

BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 3 minutes 10 seconds)
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Yes but can you vectorize it?(block mode) –  awiebe Dec 30 '12 at 5:58
    
Hi sorry. I'm confused. I thought a pixel was made of 3 rgb colours? How come the 'result' array is made up of single integer values? Surely ratio of the rbg values is lost when you add then together in that argb int variable? –  Greg Cawthorne Feb 23 '13 at 13:57
1  
@GregCawthorne See this answer stackoverflow.com/a/2615537/408286. –  Mota Feb 23 '13 at 20:49
3  
For those too lazy to read the code, there are two tests convertTo2DUsingGetRGB and convertTo2DWithoutUsingGetRGB. The first test on average takes 16 seconds. The second test on average takes 1.5 seconds. At first I thought the "s" and "ms" were two different columns. @Mota, great reference. –  Jason Mar 26 '13 at 20:30
1  
@Mota In convertTo2DUsingGetRGB why do you take result[row][col] = image.getRGB(col, row); instead of result[row][col] = image.getRGB(row, col); –  Kailash Feb 2 at 18:25

Something like this?

int[][] pixels = new int[w][h];

for( int i = 0; i < w; i++ )
    for( int j = 0; j < h; j++ )
        pixels[i][j] = img.getRGB( i, j );
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6  
Isn't that incredibly inefficient? I'd have though BufferedImage would store the pixels using a 2D int array, anyway? –  ryyst Jun 29 '11 at 16:47
    
I'm pretty sure the image is stored internally as a single-dimensional data structure. So the operation will take O(W*H) no matter how you do it. You could avoiding the method call overhead by storing it into a single-dimensional array first and get converting the single-dimensional array to a 2D-array. –  tskuzzy Jun 29 '11 at 16:49
2  
@ryyst if you want all pixels in an array, this is about as efficient as it gets –  Sean Patrick Floyd Jun 29 '11 at 16:49
1  
+1, I don't think this accesses the Raster's data buffer, which is definitely a good thing since that results in acceleration punting. –  mre Jun 29 '11 at 16:51
1  
@tskuzzy This method is slower. Check the method by Mota , that is faster than this conventional method. –  h4ck3d Jun 9 '12 at 7:48

If useful, try this:

BufferedImage imgBuffer = ImageIO.read(new File("c:\\image.bmp"));

byte[] pixels = (byte[])imgBuffer.getRaster().getDataElements(0, 0, imgBuffer.getWidth(), imgBuffer.getHeight(), null);
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4  
An explanation would be helpful –  AsheeshR Jan 10 '13 at 17:26

This worked for me:

BufferedImage bufImgs = ImageIO.read(new File("c:\\adi.bmp"));    
double[][] data = new double[][];
bufImgs.getData().getPixels(0,0,bufImgs.getWidth(),bufImgs.getHeight(),data[i]);    
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3  
What's the variable i ? –  Nicolas Marchildon Aug 12 '13 at 15:46

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