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I have two functions bound to a click event at two different times (using jQuery). The order in which they are fired is significant. They are firing in the correct order. The problem is, when the first function returns false, the second function is still firing!

How can I properly cancel the event?

Example code:

$(document).click(function() { 
  alert('a');
  return false;
});

$(document).click(function() {
  alert('b');
});

You will still see the "b" alert message when clicking the page. This is unacceptable!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 73 down vote accepted

Use the stopImmediatePropagation function of the jQuery event object.

Keeps the rest of the handlers from being executed. This method also stops the bubbling by calling event.stopPropagation().

$(document).click(function(event) { 
  alert('a');
  event.stopImmediatePropagation();
  return false;
});

$(document).click(function() {
  alert('b');
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Ken. I knew this answer was out there somewhere. –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:36
    
Thanks for the points :) –  Ken Browning Mar 16 '09 at 23:37
    
Nice find. I skimmed over the event page and totally missed this one. –  Paolo Bergantino Mar 16 '09 at 23:40
1  
You might want to note that you need to be using jQuery version 1.3 and above for this to work. –  Josh Stodola Mar 17 '09 at 0:08
4  
To this day, this answer is still helpful. Just helped me and we're almost at the end of 2011. Thanks from the future Ken. –  DigitalSea Nov 14 '11 at 3:36

The first thing I'm asking is: why do you have two functions bound to the same click event? Having access to the code, why don't you just make that one single call?

$(function (){
    var callbackOne = function(e){
    	alert("I'm the first callback... Warning, I might return false!");
    	return false;
    };

    var callbackTwo = function(e){
    	alert("I'm the second callback");
    };

    $(document).click(function (e){
    	if(callbackOne(e)){
    		callbackTwo(e);
    	}
    });
});
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4  
Organization. There is a ton of Javascript code in this app, and it is split up into SEVERAL files. This way, each page only downloads what is necessary, resulting in rapid load times. I have an HTTP handler that combines, compresses, and caches them, too, so they all get fetched in one request. –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:32
    
Ok. So is there really the need for -1? Just trying to help... Your explanation is enough to let us all know it's not the solution for you. –  Seb Mar 16 '09 at 23:34
1  
I did not -1, dude! –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:35
1  
Sorry then! :) Don't know who would want to waste his reputation by down-voting a possible valid answer for other people... –  Seb Mar 16 '09 at 23:37
2  
+1. I've answered plenty of questions by asking "Why are you doing it this way instead of this other way?" Sometimes the asker isn't aware of or forgot to consider other options. –  Spencer Ruport Mar 17 '09 at 0:24

Thanks, unbind works for redefining functions.

  $(document).ready(function(){
        $("#buscar_mercaderia").click(function(){ alert('Seleccione Tipo de mercaderia'); 
   });
$(".tipo").live('click',function(){
            if($(this).attr('checked')!=''){
                if($(this).val()=='libro'){
                    $("#buscar_mercaderia").unbind('click');
                    $("#buscar_mercaderia").click(function(){  window.open('buscar_libro.php','Buscar Libros', 'width=800,height=500'); });
                }else if($(this).val()=='otra'){
                    $("#buscar_mercaderia").unbind('click');
                    $("#buscar_mercaderia").click(function(){ window.open('buscar_mercaderia.php','Buscar Mercaderias', 'width=800,height=500');  });
                }
            }
        })
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Does using unbind help?

$(document).click(function() { 
  alert('a');
  $(this).unbind('click');
  return false;
});
share|improve this answer
3  
I still need my second event to fire when the first function does NOT return false. Won't unbinding literally "unbind it"? –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:19
    
yeah. it's probably not a great solution overall... –  nickf Mar 16 '09 at 23:19
    
you can merge my solution with nickf solution and you'll get your behavior :) –  fmsf Mar 16 '09 at 23:21
1  
Problem with unbind is that other bound function will fail to trigger. –  Seb Mar 16 '09 at 23:25
2  
The whole approach seems like a tacky workaround! I need a simple way to cancel the event, nothing more. In regular Javascript, a return means a return, be it true or false. Doesn't seem the same way in jQuery. There HAS to be a way to simulate the "return" functionality using jQuery. –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:25

If what nickf said doesn't work, you could use a small state machine:

var trigger = 0;

$(document).click(function() { 

  alert('a');
  if(you_want_to_return_false) {
    trigger = 1;
    return false;
  }
});

$(document).click(function() {
  if(trigger !== 0) {
  alert('b');
  } 
  trigger = 0;
});

Not the prettiest solution, but it will work.

share|improve this answer
    
well, my idea works it's just that it breaks it at the same time. +1 for this idea though. –  nickf Mar 16 '09 at 23:20
    
This method breaks exactly the same way as the other one does, except with more code. Correct me if I am wrong. –  Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:22
    
sorry let me redo it –  fmsf Mar 16 '09 at 23:27

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