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I'm not talking about generic classes that declare properties or fields with the type of a generic parameter. I'm talking about generic properties which could be applied to both generic and non-generic classes.

I'm not talking about this:

public class Base<T>
{
    public T BaseProperty { get; set; }
}

I'm talking about this:

public class Base
{
    public T BaseProperty<T>
    {
       get
       {
          // Insert magic
       }
       set
       {
          // Insert magic
       }
    }
}

Or this:

public class Base<U>
{
    public T BaseProperty<T>
    {
       get
       {
          // Insert magic
       }
       set
       {
          // Insert magic
       }
    }

    public U OtherBaseProperty { get; set; }
}

The usage would go something like this:

var b = new Base();
b.BaseProperty<int> = 42;
int i = b.BaseProperty<int>;
b.BaseProperty<string> = "Hi";
string s = b.BaseProperty<string>;

Or for the second example:

var b = new Base<string>();
b.BaseProperty<int> = 42;
int i = b.BaseProperty<int>;
b.OtherBaseProperty = "Hi";
string s = b.OtherBaseProperty;

The // Insert Magic refers to handling each call to the generic property getter or setter that has a different type for the type parameter.

For example this:

b.BaseProperty<int> = 42;

Needs to be handled differently to:

b.BaseProperty<string> = "Hi";

I would envisage that for each type T if the getter is called before the setter is called then default(T) is returned. When the setter is called the value is stored per type T so that when the getter is subsequently called the previous value that was set for that type is returned.

Note that under the covers properties are just methods.

Do you think this would be useful?

share|improve this question
    
No, it does not seem all that useful. If I need an int property, I'll make one. If I need a string property, I'll make one. Pretty simple. – Josh Stodola Mar 16 '09 at 23:29
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I've had a couple of times where I would have liked the ability to do this, yes.

However, the syntax involved would be pretty ugly, and it's sufficiently rarely useful that I think I prefer to just suck it up and go with generic methods.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, there's been once or twice when it would have been handy. I asked Mads Torgersen @ MS about this once and he basically said, "Why would you wanna do that?" In other words, the edge cases are not compelling enough. – core Mar 16 '09 at 23:51
    
These kinds of properties can be implemented using traits: scg.unibe.ch/Research/Rotor/index.html, unfortunately for .Net they never made it out of research ... – Pop Catalin Mar 16 '09 at 23:53
    
Thanks Jon. I'm enjoying your book very much by the way. I was just reading about generics last night and had this idea. – Jonathan Parker Mar 16 '09 at 23:56
    
@Jonathan: Glad your having fun with it - please mail me if you have any feedback, good or bad :) – Jon Skeet Mar 17 '09 at 6:23
    
@Jon: Will do. P.S. I would love to hear your thoughts on stackoverflow.com/questions/656564 – Jonathan Parker Mar 18 '09 at 2:55

No .

share|improve this answer

Without a killer use case, no. You can already achieve the same thing with a pair of generic methods, should you need it.

share|improve this answer

No.

Generic methods make sense, because they embody some (generic) operation that can sensibly be applied to different types.

But properties only make sense as uniquely named values with definite content. 'Generic properties', like you suggest, really only amounts to like-named properties with different signature and different content.

share|improve this answer

Here's one example where it would have been handy for me, if it would have been possible.

var settings = new Settings();  
int timeout = settings<int>["CacheInMinutes"];

Where Settings loads an XML file of configuration variables.

That, compared to:

var settings = new Settings();  
int timeout = int.Parse(settings["CacheInMinutes"]);

Really not much of a difference, but hey, I still would have preferred the generic indexer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah but "int timeout = settings.Get<int>("CacheInMinutes");" is just as terse, and doesn't require language change/addition to implement. – Chris Mar 17 '09 at 0:17
    
Good one. Indexers look like a good use case: Session<User>["CurrentUser"] = new User(); ... var user = Session<User>["CurrentUser"]; – Jonathan Parker Mar 17 '09 at 0:27

well, I have the situation that need generic property in non-generic class.

Example you have IComponent class that want to provide its parent IContainer with property Parent, since the component can belong to any container type. so you need to provide generic property rather than generic method

Component c = new Component();
Container p = new Container();
p.Add(c);

and then you access its parent using generic property (not aplicable now)

c.Parent.ContainerProperty;
c.Parent.ContainerMethod();

rather using verbose method like

c.Parent().ContainerProperty;
c.Parent().ContainerMethod();

Well, in this case generic property is more beautiful and make sense, since you don't need to input any argument.

share|improve this answer

If for some bizarre reason you decided you wanted it, you could sort of fake it with methods:

public class Thing
{
    Dictionary<Type, object> xDict = new Dictionary<Type,object>();
    public void set_X<T>(T x)
    {
        xDict[typeof(T)] = x;
    }
    public T get_X<T>()
    {
        return (T)xDict[typeof(T)];
    }
}

Why you would want to is an entirely different matter, though. It generally makes more sense to start with something you want to do than some way you want to do it.

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