Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm just learning PyGTK and I came across the plug and sockets section. I don't really understand what they are used for - could anyone give me a real life example of a program where they would be used to illustrate what it is that they do?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Incidentally I'm looking into this myself, so take my answer as "peer learning" not as the one of a super-expert on the subject.

I don't really understand what they are used for

Substantially they are used to connect two GUI that are not necessarily belonging to the same piece of software. Think to a music mixer: the people who built it provided it with a number of sockets (jack ports) and then each user can plug in whatever instrument they wish (standard jacks).

In this metaphor, both the mixer and the music instrument are different program, but they have a common way of encoding the signal (the gtk.Widget class) to exchange programs.

Again, I am not expert, but I read that QT, for example, makes a much more extensive use of this concept, using it also internally to the same application.

could anyone give me a real life example of a program where they would be used to illustrate what it is that they do?

Not sure here, you could try to use google code search, though.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. good analogy –  lollercoaster Jul 6 '11 at 4:20
add comment

Ok ... I can't seem to find any real life application which is already there but I can think of an example( which has been in my wishlist and to-do list since some time now ) .

Suppose you are using stackoverflow and you want to type a reply to a question. And suppose you are also a vim user. So wouldn't you just love to be able to use vim text editor to type here too. So in such a case you can have a small text buffer window in your browser window which you can use to type your long reply and then dump the answer to the text box in the webpage. In such a case you can create a socket and a plug and build such a feature.

share|improve this answer
    
so in this case the socket is the browser and vim is the plug? –  lollercoaster Jul 1 '11 at 3:54
    
I think this link will help. Observe in that link which process( or application) creates a socket and which one creates a plug . –  Devesh Jul 1 '11 at 6:47
    
awesome. will do. thanks –  lollercoaster Jul 6 '11 at 4:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.