Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I will send value of loop index (variable i) to another class. I decided to use putExtra but to do this variable i have to be a "final".As you know that's impossible because this variable change value for each of the loop.

Here my code:

for (int i = 0; i<=20; i++) {
    btn[i].getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFF00FF00,PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

    btn[i].setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {   
            Intent intent = new Intent(newgame.this, game.class);
            intent.putExtra(game.KEY_MISSION, i);
            startActivity(intent);
        }
     });
}

If you have any ideas or solutions I would be very grateful for your reply. (Sorry for my english)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You can do this

for (int i = 0; i<=20; i++) {

       final int j = i;

         btn[i].getBackground().setColorFilter(0xFF00FF00,PorterDuff.Mode.MULTIPLY);

         btn[i].setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
             @Override
                 public void onClick(View v) {  

                Intent intent = new Intent(newgame.this, game.class);
                intent.putExtra(game.KEY_MISSION, j);
                startActivity(intent);

                 }
             });

     }
share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me by 1 second ;-) –  The Scrum Meister Jun 29 '11 at 18:06
    
Omg, <facepalm> Sorry for that question.. too many beers today.. Anyway thanks for help, that's works.. –  Skajar Jun 29 '11 at 18:11

Create an inner class that takes 'i' as a parameter to the constructor. This is an example of when NOT to use an anonymous inner class, since you are creating multiple instances with different information.

share|improve this answer
    
An anonymous inner class is fine here - you just need an extra variable in the loop. –  Jon Skeet Jun 29 '11 at 18:06
    
@Jon Skeet - You can, I just don't think you should. IMHO it is more clear to use a named class as the alternative seems a bit of a hack, although I admit the named class would be a little more code. –  Robin Jun 29 '11 at 18:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.