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I'm trying to draw an arc on a canvas in Javascript, but I want to get rid of the line that Javascript automatically draws. With the line being drawn, there are two problems: a) fill() malfunctions b) It looks like a bow

Here's an image of what I have and what I want: Arcs The left is what I have in JS, the right is what I have in Java. The Java implementation is fairly inefficient and I would like to use the functions already available.

Here are the relevant JS functions:

function pointAt(center, l, theta){
    return {
        x : Math.sin(theta) * l + center.x,
        y : Math.cos(theta) * l + center.y
    };
}

function drawArc(ctx, center, l, theta, sweep, label, thickness){
    var p0 = pointAt(center, l, theta);
    var p1 = pointAt(center, l + thickness, theta);
    var p2 = pointAt(center, l + thickness, theta + sweep);
    var p3 = pointAt(center, l, theta + sweep);
    ctx.fillStyle = "red";
    drawPoint(ctx, p0);
    ctx.fillStyle = "blue";
    drawPoint(ctx, p1);
    ctx.fillStyle = "green";
    drawPoint(ctx, p2);
    ctx.fillStyle = "yellow";
    drawPoint(ctx, p3);

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.moveTo(p0.x, p0.y);
    ctx.lineTo(p1.x, p1.y);
    ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l + thickness, theta, theta + sweep, false);
    ctx.moveTo(p2.x, p2.y);
    ctx.lineTo(p3.x, p3.y);
    ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l, theta + sweep, theta, true)
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.fill();
    ctx.stroke();

    //TODO: draw label!!!
}

function drawPoint(ctx, p){
    ctx.fillRect(p.x - 4, p.y - 4, 8, 8);
}

Here's a working implementation in Java:

       private static void drawArc(Graphics g, Point center, int l, double theta, double sweep, String label, int thickness){
        for (double i = 0; i < thickness; i+=.5) { //hardcoded
            Point last = pointAt(center, l + i, theta);
            for(double t = theta; t < theta + sweep; t+=.01){
                Point cur = pointAt(center, l + i, t);
                g.drawLine(last.x, last.y, cur.x, cur.y);
                last = cur;
            }
        }
        double t = theta + sweep / 2;
        Point p = pointAt(center, l + 15, t);
        int size = g.getFontMetrics().stringWidth(label);
        BufferedImage img = new BufferedImage(size * 2, size * 2, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);
        Graphics2D g2 = img.createGraphics();
        g2.setColor(Color.RED);
        double rot = (Math.PI / 2 - t);
//      System.out.println(rot / Math.PI + "PI");
        boolean b = true;
        if(rot < -Math.PI / 2){
            rot += Math.PI;
            b = false;
        }
        g2.setTransform(AffineTransform.getRotateInstance(rot, size, size));
        g2.drawString(label, size, size);
        g2.dispose();
        if(!b)
            size *= 1.75; //magic value or hardcoded???
        g.drawImage(img, p.x - size, p.y - size, null);
    }

So my question: How do I turn the banana into a thick arc?

share|improve this question
    
what are you calling drawArc with? –  Simon Sarris Jun 29 '11 at 18:54
    
The JS implementation? Ctx is a 2d canvas context, center is the center point of the circle, l is the radius, theta is the start angle, sweep is the angle covered (theta + sweep is the end angle), label is irrelevant, thickness is the thickness of the arc. –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 18:56
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just do:

function drawArc(ctx, center, l, theta, sweep, label, thickness){
    var p0 = pointAt(center, l, theta);
    var p1 = pointAt(center, l + thickness, theta);
    var p2 = pointAt(center, l + thickness, theta + sweep);
    var p3 = pointAt(center, l, theta + sweep);
    ctx.fillStyle = "red";
    drawPoint(ctx, p0);
    ctx.fillStyle = "blue";
    drawPoint(ctx, p1);
    ctx.fillStyle = "green";
    drawPoint(ctx, p2);
    ctx.fillStyle = "yellow";
    drawPoint(ctx, p3);

    ctx.beginPath();
    //ctx.moveTo(p0.x, p0.y);
    //ctx.lineTo(p1.x, p1.y);
    ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l + thickness, theta, theta + sweep, false);
    //ctx.moveTo(p2.x, p2.y);
    //ctx.lineTo(p3.x, p3.y);
    ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l, theta + sweep, theta, true);
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.fill();
    ctx.stroke();

    //TODO: draw label!!!
}

The "lateral" lines are implict placed, see http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/the-canvas-element.html#dom-context-2d-arc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I liked how you commented out the lines to show the problematic lines. This also did exactly what I needed. –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 19:37
1  
he didn't spot the sin/cos problem, though... –  Alnitak Jun 29 '11 at 19:38
    
@Alnitak Yeah, but you also have 34,600 points and he has 276. He benefits from points way more than you do and his answer was slightly easier to understand. (not that yours isn't readable -- it is) I gave both of you a thumbs up and you both did a good job. –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 19:53
    
@Alnitak I was focusing in the actual draw not where it was done. So didn't ever think in check the pointAt function at first and since it managed draw the "arc" some where did just move on =) –  Prusse Jun 29 '11 at 20:21
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You have way too many drawing calls too - this is all you need:

ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l + thickness, theta, theta + sweep, false);
ctx.arc(center.x, center.y, l, theta + sweep, theta, true);
ctx.closePath();
ctx.fill();
ctx.stroke();

Just draw the first arc, which will automatically get joined to the next, and then close the path to complete the loop.

You also have your sin and cos calls the wrong way around in pointAt() - sin() should alter the Y axis coordinate, not the X axis!

Working demo at http://jsfiddle.net/alnitak/zChSe/

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, you're right. cos affects x. I never noticed the issue. –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 19:33
    
Perfect :D Did exactly what I needed. Thanks! –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 19:36
1  
@Ryan yeah, using 0 and pi/2 as your test angles would make it less obvious, too! NB: if you no longer need the test dots you don't need the pointAt() function anyway. –  Alnitak Jun 29 '11 at 19:37
    
Yeah, I got rid of the test dots. I never noticed it because I was too focused on the look of the graph to worry about the math! I don't think it would have mattered until I gave it to another person to try out and they came back unhappy :P –  Ryan Amos Jun 29 '11 at 19:40
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Just draw the outer arc clockwise, then the inner arc counter-clockwise. The canvas will automatically close off the ends with straight lines for you.

var c = document.getElementById('c');
var ctx = c.getContext('2d');
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(0,0,50,0,-Math.PI * 0.5, false);
ctx.arc(0,0,25,-Math.PI * 0.5,0, true);
ctx.fillStyle = '#0f0';
ctx.fill();
ctx.strokeStyle = '#0f0';
ctx.stroke();
ctx.closePath();

http://jsfiddle.net/tMEdq/

Also, here are good references: http://diveintohtml5.ep.io/canvas.html#divingin http://www.nihilogic.dk/labs/canvas_sheet/HTML5_Canvas_Cheat_Sheet.png

share|improve this answer
    
most of those moveTo and lineTo calls are completely unnecessary –  Alnitak Jun 29 '11 at 19:18
    
@Alnitak not most...all. Answer edited to reflect that. –  Bobby Jun 29 '11 at 20:26
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