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From the server I get a datetime variable in this format: 6/29/2011 4:52:48 PM and it is in UTC time. I want to convert it to the current user's browser time using JavaScript.

How this can be done using JavaScript or jQuery?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 72 down vote accepted

Append 'UTC' to the string before converting it to a date in javascript:

var date = new Date('6/29/2011 4:52:48 PM UTC');
date.toString() // "Wed Jun 29 2011 09:52:48 GMT-0700 (PDT)"
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function localizeDateStr (date_to_convert_str) { var date_to_convert = new Date(date_to_convert_str); var local_date = new Date(); date_to_convert.setHours(date_to_convert.getHours()+local_date.getTimezoneOffset‌​()); return date_to_convert.toString(); } –  matt Oct 9 '12 at 17:08
2  
@matt offSet returns minutes, not hours, you need to divide by 60 –  bladefist May 18 '13 at 16:13
    
Perfect!! I tried many different approaches, which worked but were too lengthy. This one's a bulls-eye! –  Rahul Dole May 27 '13 at 11:00
    
@matt also note there are timezones which are fractions of hours off. and you don't need to use timezone offset when there are getter and setter functions for both UTC and local values –  mizuki nakeshu Jun 14 '13 at 9:44
    
does this take into account the offset ? –  euther Mar 10 at 3:23

Matt's answer is missing the fact that the daylight savings time could be different between Date() and the date time it needs to convert - here is my solution:

    function ConvertUTCTimeToLocalTime(UTCDateString)
    {
        var convertdLocalTime = new Date(UTCDateString);

        var hourOffset = convertdLocalTime.getTimezoneOffset() / 60;

        convertdLocalTime.setHours( convertdLocalTime.getHours() + hourOffset ); 

        return convertdLocalTime;
    }

And the results in the debugger:

UTCDateString: "2014-02-26T00:00:00"
convertdLocalTime: Wed Feb 26 2014 00:00:00 GMT-0800 (Pacific Standard Time)
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**

Use this for both

**

//Covert datetime by GMT offset 
//If toUTC is true then return UTC time other wise return local time
function convertLocalDateToUTCDate(date, toUTC) {
    date = new Date(date);
    //Local time converted to UTC
    console.log("Time :" + date);
    var localOffset = date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000;
    var localTime = date.getTime();
    if (toUTC)
    {
        date = localTime + localOffset;
    }
    else
    {
        date = localTime - localOffset;
    }
    date = new Date(date);
    console.log("Converted time" + date);
    return date;
}
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This is an universal solution:

function convertUTCDateToLocalDate(date) {
    var newDate = new Date(date.getTime()+date.getTimezoneOffset()*60*1000);

    var offset = date.getTimezoneOffset() / 60;
    var hours = date.getHours();

    newDate.setHours(hours - offset);

    return newDate;   
}

Usage:

var date = convertUTCDateToLocalDate(new Date(date_string_you_received));

Display the date based on the client local setting:

date.toLocaleString();
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Bravo! It works. –  Branislav Sep 13 '13 at 14:05
3  
Does not work with all timezones. There is a good reason why getTimeZoneOffset is in minutes ! geographylists.com/list20d.html –  siukurnin Sep 19 '13 at 8:28
2  
@siukurnin. so to manage weird timezone, use newDate.setTime(date.getTime()+date.getTimezoneOffset()*60*1000) –  Guillaume Gendre Sep 23 '13 at 14:34
1  
newDate.setMinutes(date.getMinutes() - date.getTimezoneOffset()) would be enough. In corrects hours as well –  Lu55 Oct 23 '13 at 14:10
    
Thanks for the correction! –  Adorjan Princz Mar 11 at 20:17

To me the simplest seemed using

datetime.setUTCHours(datetime.getHours());
datetime.setUTCMinutes(datetime.getMinutes());

(i thought the first line could be enough but there are timezones which are off in fractions of hours)

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Put this function in your head:

<script type="text/javascript">
function localize(t)
{
  var d=new Date(t+" UTC");
  document.write(d.toString());
}
</script>

Then generate the following for each date in the body of your page:

<script type="text/javascript">localize("6/29/2011 4:52:48 PM");</script>

To remove the GMT and time zone, change the following line:

document.write(d.toString().replace(/GMT.*/g,""));
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localize("6/29/2011 4:52:48"); it is not working in FireFox as i am using 24 hrs format –  BrainCoder Nov 27 '12 at 12:53
1  
thank you so much. I've been searching the most efficient way to localizing UTC time for hours. You sir is a gentlemen and scholar! –  jiaoziren Jul 22 '13 at 12:14

You should get the (UTC) offset (in minutes) of the client:

var offset = new Date().getTimezoneOffset();

And then do the correspondent adding or substraction to the time you get from the server.

Hope this helps.

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this definitely help when i convert user input into server utc time, –  anIBMer Apr 2 at 6:05

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