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I'm confused when it comes down to saving a state. So I know that onSaveInstanceState(Bundle) is called when the activity is about to be destroyed. But how do you store your information in if and bring it back to its original state in onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState)? I don't understand how this bundle will restore information... It would be helpful for someone to provide an example? The Dev guide doesn't do a good job of explaining this.

public class Conversation extends Activity {
    private ProgressDialog progDialog;
    int typeBar;
    TextView text1;
    EditText edit;
    Button respond;
    private String name;
    private String textAtView;
    private String savedName;

    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState){
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.dorothydialog);
        text1 = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.dialog);
        edit = (EditText)findViewById(R.id.repsond);
        respond = (Button)findViewById(R.id.button01);



        if(savedInstanceState != null){


        savedInstanceState.get(savedName);

            text1.setText(savedName);



        }else{
            text1.setText("Hello! What is your name?");


        respond.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                name = edit.getText().toString();

                text1.setText("Nice to meet you "+ name);


        }   
            });
        }
    }



        @Override
        public void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState){
            super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
            outState.putString(savedName, name);

    }
}
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text1.setText(savedInstanceState.getString(savedName)); –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:40
    
@Spidy What about onBackpressed? How would i react to this with the bundle? –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:45
    
You wouldn't. When the user presses the back button. The activity is killed. Use a database for permanent data storage. Use the Bundle for returning a restarted application to its previous state. –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:48
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4 Answers

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The Bundle is a container for all the information you want to save. You use the put* functions to insert data into it. Here's a short list (there are more) of put functions you can use to store data in the Bundle.

putString
putBoolean
putByte
putChar
putFloat
putLong
putShort
putParcelable (used for objects but they must implement Parcelable)

In your onCreate function, this Bundle is handed back to the program. The best way to check if the application is being reloaded, or started for the first time is:

if( savedInstanceState != null ) {
 //Then the application is being reloaded
}

To get the data back out, use the get* functions just like the put* functions. The data is stored as a name-value pair. This is like a hashmap. You provide a key and the value, then when you want the value back, you give the key and the function gets the value. Here's a short example.

@Override
public void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
   super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
   outState.putString("message", "This is my message to be reloaded");
}

@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
  super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
  if( savedInstanceState != null ) {
     Toast.makeText(this, savedInstanceState .getString("message"), Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
  }
}

Your saved message will be toasted to the screen. Hope this helps.

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3  
onSaveInstanceState() is called before your activity is paused. So any info that it needs after it is potentially destroyed can be retrieved from the saved Bundle –  Diederik Jun 29 '11 at 19:05
    
@Diederik - Good addition. –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:06
    
@Spidy Awesome! You just really made me understand everything about a bundle! so im guessing outState is passed back to the savedInstanceState bundle? Correct? –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:08
    
Yep. The outState Bundle is passed back in as the savedInstanceState Bundle –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:14
1  
@tj walker - Another great resource are technical reference books. Pro Android 3 is a cheap but extensive resource you can get on Amazon –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:19
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One major note that all new Android developers should know is that any information in Widgets (TextView, Buttons, etc.) will be persisted automatically by Android as long as you assign an ID to them. So that means most of the UI state is taken care of without issue. Only when you need to store other data does this become an issue.

From Android Docs:

The only work required by you is to provide a unique ID (with the android:id attribute) for each widget you want to save its state. If a widget does not have an ID, then it cannot save its state

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Well is that really true? Because i have an activity with a button textview and edit text. If the application is destroyed or killed everything is returned to its original state. In my application the textView texts changes everytime the user clickes the button. –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:12
    
Is the documentation inaccurate? I've never had a View save its own information. Your best bet is to save all your information yourself in my opinion. –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:18
    
If your goal is to save information onSaveInstanceState is NOT the place to do it. That is because there is no guarantee that it will be called (see docs). You should instead write to a database, SharedPreferences, etc. Yes this information is accurate. The best way to test if your UI is persisting in this fashion is to rotate your display as orientation changes rerun your onCreate and use the bundle to restore state. –  Cat Man Do Jun 29 '11 at 19:29
    
@Nissan Fan can you give an example as spidy did above? With the sharedprefs and all? Thanks –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:33
    
The best examples quite frankly come from the documentation. developer.android.com/guide/topics/data/data-storage.html#pref –  Cat Man Do Jun 29 '11 at 19:37
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Basically onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outBundle) will give you a bundle. When you look at the Bundle class, you will see that you can put lots of different stuff inside it. At the next call of onCreate(), you just get that Bundle back as an argument. Then you can read your values again and restore your activity.

Lets say you have an activity with an EditText. The user wrote some text inside it. After that the system calls your onSaveInstanceState(). You read the text from the EditText and write it into the Bundle via Bundle.putString("edit_text_value", theValue).

Now onCreate is called. You check if the supplied bundle is not null. If thats the case, you can restore your value via Bundle.getString("edit_text_value") and put it back into your EditText.

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@alextsc Thanks for that response it again help me understand everything! You guys are awesome on stackover flow.. How do you guys become experts at this? –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:10
1  
Youre welcome. Im far from beeing an expert. I learn tons of stuff here everyday. To learn this stuff i recommend coding, just lots of coding. You bump into lots of problems and learn on the way. :) –  user658042 Jun 29 '11 at 19:12
    
Yeah thats pretty much what ive been doing. Ive just ran into the bundle issue recently. I run out of application idea's though. Everything is already created. –  tj walker Jun 29 '11 at 19:15
    
I agree with alextsc. Far from being an expert. You just pick up things from lots of trial and error. –  Spidy Jun 29 '11 at 19:18
    
Dont think that way. Most people criticize Android for the low app quality. So theres plenty off stuff to build in an awesome, user-friendly way. And thats what people like (Bad search engines were crushed by a well executed search engine named Google, for example. ). So, keep coding. :) –  user658042 Jun 29 '11 at 19:20
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This is for extra information.

Imagine this scenario

  1. ActivityA launch ActivityB.
  2. ActivityB launch a new ActivityAPrime by

    Intent intent = new Intent(getApplicationContext(), ActivityA.class);
    startActivity(intent);
    
  3. ActivityAPrime has no relationship with ActivityA.
    In this case the Bundle in ActivityAPrime.onCreate() will be null.

If ActivityA and ActivityAPrime should be the same activity instead of different activities, ActivityB should call finish() than using startActivity().

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