Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Pardon the framework specific code. Please just take my word that the objects do what I say they do.

My Code

       //Generates a random five digit alphanumerical id
       $aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');

       //calls the active record class for table Person                     
       $person = new Person();

       //searches the person table to see if this alias is being used         
       $search = $person->find('alias=:alias', array(':alias'=>$aliasId));

       //if null then it sets an attribute for a another active record class                     
       if ($search==NULL)
       {
               $model->setAttribute('alias', $aliasId);
               $model->setIsNewRecord(TRUE);
       }
       else
       {
       //I need to loop through the above code until I find an alias that isn't being used                            
       }

My Question

What do I write in the else statement to run through the code above until I find an alias that isn't being used in the Person table. My guess is some kind of loop, but I'm just not really sure how to do it. Feel free to re-work this how you like. Put it as its own function/tell me I'm doing it wrong, I won't be offended. Thank you SO!

share|improve this question
    
Does $aliasId have to be random? This could be much more efficient if you used auto-generated sequential values. – George Cummins Jun 29 '11 at 19:27
    
It needs to be alphanumeric which mysql doesn't do – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:28
    
A good idea, but that would grow the number eventually. I need it to be five digits. – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:35
    
Is there some other way to increment it (i.e. a custom function)? E.g. it starts as 00000 than after 99999 it goes to 0000a -> 9999z -> 0000A etc. – JoshB Jun 29 '11 at 19:40
    
I suppose that could work. How to do it: I'd have to ask another SO question. Good idea though. Why not have all the logic in one place. How would it save "state"? How would it know what increment it's on? I guess a query of the latest record. – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted
$found = false;
$iter = 0;        // It's a good idea to include an upper bound on the number of iterations
while(!$found && $iter < 1000){
   $aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');

   //calls the active record class for table Person                     
   $person = new Person();

   //searches the person table to see if this alias is being used         
   $search = $person->find('alias=:alias', array(':alias'=>$aliasId));

   //if null then it sets an attribute for a another active record class                     
   if (is_null($search)){
       $model->setAttribute('alias', $aliasId);
       $model->setIsNewRecord(TRUE);
       $found = true;
   }
   $iter++;
}

if(!$found){ /* Some error condition because a suitable ID could not be found*/ }

However, it may be a better idea to use an auto-incremented value for the alias-id if it does not have to be randomly generated.

To convert the number to and from base36 you can use PHP's base_convert function:

$a = base_convert(12345,10,36);
$b = base_convert($a,36,10);
print "12345 --> ".$a."  --> ".$b;

output:

12345 --> 9ix  --> 12345

If you want to make sure that your number is at least 5 digits start your increment value at: base_convert(10000,36,10) = 1679616

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not aware that MySQL does alphanumeric auto-incrementing? – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:40
    
@k to the z: You could always select the largest alphanumerical value, convert it to an integer, increment it by 1 and then convert it back. It would probably be more efficient than generating a random string over and over until you find one (especially if your database starts to accumulate a lot of entries). – GWW Jun 29 '11 at 19:43
    
That's probably the best solution. Any way you could show what you mean by converting the alphanumerical value to an integer and back in your answer? The key here making sure the ID stays 5 digits. – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:47

I would go with a while loop...

//calls the active record class for table Person                     
$person = new Person();

//Generates a random five digit alphanumerical id
$aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');

while ($person->find('alias=:alias', array(':alias'=>$aliasId)))
{
    $aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');
}
//sets an attribute for a another active record class                     
$model->setAttribute('alias', $aliasId);
$model->setIsNewRecord(TRUE);

I would really look into a better way to generate the aliasId value, because once you have a lot of "person" records, you're going to be looping for a long time.

share|improve this answer
    
That while is in the wrong place. The id isn't going to change between loops – JoshB Jun 29 '11 at 19:38
    
@joshb I think it looks just fine. – dimi Jun 29 '11 at 19:43
    
@dbalaouras Sorry, you are right. I misread the code. – JoshB Jun 29 '11 at 19:47

My version with a max iteration setting (set to -1 if you want to let it run until it finds a unique)

$person = new Person();
$unique = false;
$maxloops = 100;
while($maxloops>=0){
    //Generates a random five digit alphanumerical id
    $aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');
    //searches the person table to see if this alias is being used
    $unique = empty($person->find('alias=:alias', array(':alias'=>$aliasId)));         
    if($unique) break;
    $maxloops--;
}

if($unique){
    $model->setAttribute('alias', $aliasId);
    $model->setIsNewRecord(TRUE);
}else{
    trigger_error("oops!");
}
share|improve this answer

How about this:

$search = true; //set to a non-null value
while (!is_null($search)) {
    $aliasId = $model->random_id_gen('5');

    //calls the active record class for table Person                     
    $person = new Person();

    //searches the person table to see if this alias is being used         
    $search = $person->find('alias=:alias', array(':alias'=>$aliasId));
}
$model->setAttribute('alias', $aliasId);
$model->setIsNewRecord(TRUE);
share|improve this answer
    
You should use is_null rather than !== for NULL values. – GWW Jun 29 '11 at 19:33
    
@GWW Thanks for that – JoshB Jun 29 '11 at 19:37
    
@GWW, Is that more efficient or a best practice or both? P.S. I'm waiting on SO to weight these answers before I mark the right one. – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:38
    
@k to the z: From what I understand is that it's a best practice, to make sure that the value is indeed NULL and not false or 0 etc. – GWW Jun 29 '11 at 19:41
    
@GWW, Thank you. – k to the z Jun 29 '11 at 19:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.