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We use svn:ingored to mask out externally sourced files (aka compiled or copied) from our projects. Is there a way to remove just those files and directories as part of an ant cleanup target?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Never used svnant, but from the documentation it seems they provide some selectors, a svnIgnored selector f.e.,
so in theory it should work like that :

 <delete>
  <fileset dir="workingcopy">
   <svnIgnored/>
  </fileset>
 </delete>
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thanks, will give it a try –  Stevko Jun 29 '11 at 21:29
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I recommend having a clean target that gets rid of those, It will work in all cases and even if you get the source by doing an svn export. And it's very clear from looking at the build script what's being deleted. It will also still work if your team moves to [insert new SCM system here].

<target name="clean">
    <delete dir="${build.dir}" />
    <delete dir="${dist.dir}" />
    <delete dir="${reports.dir}" />
</target>

<target name="init" depends="clean">
    <mkdir dir="${build.dir}" />
    <mkdir dir="${dist.dir}" />
    <mkdir dir="${reports.dir}" />
</target>
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I do have a clean target but not all temp files are within disposable directories. Builds tend to form a composite of both derived files and version controlled files. svn:ignore is the easiest way to enumerate that list as it changes rather than cluttering up the make file. –  Stevko Jul 5 '11 at 18:50
    
hmm... seems way easier to have all the derived artifacts under a small number of disposable directories (like build and dist), especially if the list changes with regularity. Did you find a workable solution for your team? –  thekbb Jul 6 '11 at 16:21
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