Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following:

$ echo index.html* | xargs -L 1 ls -l
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki  17198 2011-05-03 23:18 index.html
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki  17198 2011-05-03 23:20 index.html.1
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki  17198 2011-05-03 23:21 index.html.2
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki 146589 2011-05-05 12:29 index.html.3
$ echo index.html* | xargs -n 1 ls -l
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki 17198 2011-05-03 23:18 index.html
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki 17198 2011-05-03 23:20 index.html.1
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki 17198 2011-05-03 23:21 index.html.2
-rw-r--r-- 1 zeki zeki 146589 2011-05-05 12:29 index.html.3

Why does the -n option yield an incorrect formatting? Just in case, I'm using bash under Ubuntu. Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

-L splits by lines; echo doesn't separate its output by lines but by spaces, so a single ls -l is run and that formats all the columns as a group.

-n splits by parameters; in the absence of -L or -0, the separator is whitespace (possibly modified by quoting), so each filename gets its own ls -l run and there is no way for the independent runs to coordinate column widths.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it, +1. –  larsmans Jun 29 '11 at 21:13
    
Thanks! Now it's clear. –  eze Jun 30 '11 at 7:33

The POSIX standard mandates:

-L number

The utility shall be executed for each non-empty number lines of arguments from standard input. The last invocation of utility shall be with fewer lines of arguments if fewer than number remain. A line is considered to end with the first unless the last character of the line is a <blank>; a trailing <blank> signals continuation to the next non-empty line, inclusive.

-n number

Invoke utility using as many standard input arguments as possible, up to number (a positive decimal integer) arguments maximum.

(Emphasis added.) Since echo * produces a single line, xargs -L 1 just feeds all of the filenames to ls at once, and only then can ls nicely align the columns.

(In other words, your first command is equivalent ls -l index.html*, except that it doesn't handle filenames containing blanks correctly.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you too!! –  eze Jun 30 '11 at 7:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.