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public static int Test(int n)
{
  if (n < 0) return 1;
  if (n == 0) return 2;
  if (n > 0) return 3;
}

Compiler (Visual Studio 2010, C# 4.0) says "Not all code paths return a value". Why?

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you mean if (n == 0)? –  Scott Weinstein Jun 29 '11 at 21:15
1  
Hi, I edited your post to show all the code. In StackOverflow, you just need to either 1. indent any code with four spaces, or 2. Highlight your code when you're done and click the {} button. (Your code was caught up by the < and > characters, I think.) –  Platinum Azure Jun 29 '11 at 21:16
    
why the operator between n and 0 is missing? –  Valipour Jun 29 '11 at 21:16
    
Why bother with the last comparison (n>0)? It's obviously going to be > 0 if it gets to that point, so skip the redundant comparison and just return 3 if you get to that point. –  Nick Shaw Jun 29 '11 at 21:18
1  
Also, I suppose you could theoretically change the value of 'n' during the function, and even though you don't, the compiler can't guarantee that?... –  Nick Shaw Jun 29 '11 at 21:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The compiler isn't looking at your conditions. Even though you are correct that at least one of your if-blocks will run, you still need to refactor to something like this:

if (n < 0)
    return 1;
else if (n == 0)
    return 2;
else
    return 3;
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The compiler doesn't try to determine that this covers all the possible values of n. All it sees is that you have three if statements, and it assumes that it's possible for all of them to be false... in which case you'd reach the end of the method without returning a value.

See this blog post from Eric Lippert for more details about the compiler's limits when it comes to reachability.

Just make the final return unconditional.

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1  
+1 - I think I'll just defer to you :) –  Adam Rackis Jun 29 '11 at 21:17
    
+1 for linking to Lippert. –  Platinum Azure Jun 29 '11 at 21:19
    
+1 good answer. –  user195488 Jun 29 '11 at 21:20
    
Jon Skeet -> Eric Lippert -> Alan Turning -> Halting problem –  Jonas Elfström Jun 29 '11 at 21:28
    
@Platinum: No-one ever got fired for linking to Eric, as it were... –  Jon Skeet Jun 29 '11 at 21:29

The compiler isn't smart enough to know that all of those branches are mutually exclusive, so it worries about the fallthrough case where all three if statements fail.

You can either link all the if statements with else and use only else for the last condition, or you can return a default value at the end. This will get around the issue.

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3  
It has even been proved that it never can be smart enough. It's called the Halting problem. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halting_problem –  Jonas Elfström Jun 29 '11 at 21:30
    
@Jonas Elfström: Very true. :-) –  Platinum Azure Jun 29 '11 at 21:52

The compiler doesn't know you've covered all your bases. You can rewrite it like this...

public static int Test(int n)
{
  if (n < 0) return 1;
  else if (n == 0) return 2;
  else (n > 0) return 3;
}

or this...

public static int Test(int n)
{
  if (n < 0) return 1;
  if (n == 0) return 2;
  if (n > 0) return 3;
  return 4; //will never occur
}
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