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I have an application where users can take tests (which are composed of questions and answers).

I'm trying to construct a query that returns a count of answers grouped by question, for a specific teacher and test. The problem is I would like the query to return 0 count for questions with no answers.

answers

  • id
  • question_id
  • test_id
  • student_id

questions

  • id

teacher_students

  • student_id
  • teacher_id

tests

  • id

Query

   SELECT COUNT(answers.id) AS rcount,
          questions.id 
     FROM "questions"
LEFT JOIN answers ON answers.question_id = questions.id
LEFT JOIN teacher_students ON teacher_students.student_id = answers.student_id
    WHERE (questions.test_id = 1)  
      AND (teacher_students.teacher_id = 1)
 GROUP BY questions.id 
 ORDER BY questions.id

Output

 rcount | question_id 
--------+----
      4 | 1
      2 | 3

Desired Output

 rcount | question_id 
--------+----
      4 | 1
      0 | 2
      2 | 3
      0 | 4

If I remove teacher_students.teacher_id = 1, the number of questions returned is correct, but the count is not.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Move the teacher_students.teacher_id = 1 check from the WHERE clause to the joining ON clause.

When a condition that refers to a table in the right side of a LEFT JOIN is put in the WHERE clause, the LEFT JOIN is cancelled and it acts as an INNER JOIN.

SELECT count(teacher_students.student_id) AS rcount      <--- changed
     , questions.id 
FROM "questions"
  LEFT JOIN answers 
    ON answers.question_id = questions.id
  LEFT JOIN teacher_students 
    ON teacher_students.student_id = answers.student_id
    AND teacher_students.teacher_id = 1
WHERE questions.test_id = 1

GROUP BY questions.id 
ORDER BY questions.id
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Your answer is good. But structurally it is better to leave ON clause for joins only. So it's better to do this: ((teacher_students.teacher_id = 1) OR (teacher_students.teacher_id is NULL)) on WHERE clause. –  Karolis Jun 29 '11 at 21:50
2  
@Karolis: No. If people are going to use OUTER JOIN syntax, they have to be aware that there is a difference between criteria in the WHERE vs criteria in the OUTER JOIN's ON clause. When using an OUTER JOIN, the WHERE clause criteria is applied after the join vs the ON clause criteria is applied before the JOIN. What you advocate can result in a significantly different result set than expected. –  OMG Ponies Jun 29 '11 at 21:55
    
@Karolis "But structurally it is better" Would you elaborate on this? I've never given a second thought to adding additional conditions to a join predicate. What are the structural problems inherent in doing so? –  Dan J Jun 29 '11 at 21:55
    
@Karolis: Yes, I agree, your suggestion may be better for making the intention clear for anyone who looks at the code later. Dealing with OR conditions is not the best attribute of MySQL optimizer though. –  ypercube Jun 29 '11 at 21:57
2  
To keep the purity of the ON clause specifying join conditions, the way to write it is to change the reference to teacher_students to be a reference to an inline view that filters teacher_students. The planner would treat this just the same as putting the filter condition in the ON clause, but IMHO it would actually provide a clearer picture of what the statement means. But some people see any subquery as "omg! evil inefficient complexity!" –  araqnid Jun 29 '11 at 23:25

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