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What is the worst real-world macros/pre-processor abuse you've ever come across (please no contrived IOCCC answers *haha*)?

Please add a short snippet or story if it is really entertaining. The goal is to teach something instead of always telling people "never use macros".


p.s.: I've used macros before... but usually I get rid of them eventually when I have a "real" solution (even if the real solution is inlined so it becomes similar to a macro).


Bonus: Give an example where the macro was really was better than a not-macro solution.

Related question: When are C++ macros beneficial?

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37  
#define true false //happy debugging :) –  n0rd Mar 17 '09 at 11:36
2  
"people are likely to get all bent out of shape and close it": Are you implying that you don't want any humorous/funny content on stack overflow? –  Trevor Boyd Smith Mar 19 '09 at 14:03
2  
Just a quick point, the pre-processor is part of the language and therefore not evil/wrong to use, just like anything else. –  John Apr 1 '10 at 10:31
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locked by Bill the Lizard May 2 '13 at 11:13

This question exists because it has historical significance, but it is not considered a good, on-topic question for this site, so please do not use it as evidence that you can ask similar questions here. This question and its answers are frozen and cannot be changed. More info: help center.

71 Answers

ASA - http://www.ingber.com/#ASA

You really have to download it to appreciate it. The entire work flow is determined by macros. It is completely unreadable. As an example -

 if (asa_open == FALSE) {
asa_open = TRUE;
++number_asa_open;
#if ASA_PRINT
if (number_asa_open == 1) {
  /* open the output file */
#if USER_ASA_OUT
  if (!strcmp (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
#if ASA_SAVE
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "a");
#else
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "w");
#endif
  }
#else /* USER_ASA_OUT */
  if (!strcmp (ASA_OUT, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
#if ASA_SAVE
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (ASA_OUT, "a");
#else
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (ASA_OUT, "w");
#endif
  }
#endif /* USER_ASA_OUT */
} else {
#if USER_ASA_OUT
  if (!strcmp (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "a");
  }
#else
  if (!strcmp (ASA_OUT, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (ASA_OUT, "a");
  }
#endif
  fprintf (ptr_asa_out, "\n\n\t\t number_asa_open = %d\n",
           number_asa_open);
}
#endif /* ASA_PRINT */
} else {
++recursive_asa_open;
#if ASA_PRINT
if (recursive_asa_open == 1) {
  /* open the output file */
#if ASA_SAVE
#if USER_ASA_OUT
  if (!strcmp (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "a");
  }
#else
  if (!strcmp (ASA_OUT, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {
    ptr_asa_out = fopen (ASA_OUT, "a");
  }
#endif
#else /* ASA_SAVE */
#if USER_ASA_OUT
  if (!strcmp (OPTIONS->Asa_Out_File, "STDOUT")) {
#if INCL_STDOUT
    ptr_asa_out = stdout;
#endif /* INCL_STDOUT */
  } else {

etc., etc.

And that is just setting up the options. the entire program is like that.

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2  
Oh my god...I think I'm getting dizzy. –  Michael Foukarakis Aug 12 '10 at 9:09
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A "technical manager" who had formerly been a coder introduced the following wonderful macros into our C++ project because he thought that checking for NULL values in DOM parsing routines was just too much work:

TRYSEGV
CATCHSEGV

Under the covers, these used setjmp, longjmp, and a signal handler for SIGSEGV to emulate the ability to "catch" a segfault.

Of course, nothing in the code reset the jump pointed once the code had exited the scope of the original TRYSEGV macro invocation, so any segfault in the code would return to the (now invalid) jump_env pointer.

The code would immediately die there, but not before destroying the program stack and rendering debugging more or less pointless.

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AI Game Programming Wisdom has a chapter where macros were used to create a scripting language for finite state machines.

Since the book and code are copyrighted material, here's a Google book link to the page detailing the macros (The resulting script language can be found on page 324.)

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3  
Why is that so evil? The macros simplify the code (to some extent). Good programming languages allow you to create mini-languages that mirror the problem domain. C offers you the preprocessor as the main option, unless you want to spell out the portable assembler... –  Pontus Gagge Mar 17 '09 at 10:50
9  
@MrValdez: Your abuse is someone else's brilliant masterpiece. :) –  MikeyB Jun 25 '09 at 20:00
1  
I think they were missing lisp... –  brice Nov 2 '11 at 11:56
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At Lucent, I once took a look at the source code of Steve Bourne's original Unix shell, and found he'd used the C pre-processor to make C look like Pascal or Algol. The part dealing with if statements looked like this:

#define IF   if (
#define THEN ) {
#define ELSE } else {
#define ELIF } else if (
#define FI   ; }

A friend of mine told me he'd done some maintenance on it in the mid-1990s, and it was still the same. (There's a lesson here for us in the inherent conservatism of a code base.)

Of course Steve did this as an experiment in the early days, and I'm sure would have had second thoughts if he'd written it later.

Update: According to Wikipedia's Bourne Shell article, the macros gave it an Algol 68 flavor. And, the full set of macros is here! They apparently influenced the founders of the International Obfuscated C Code Contest.

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2  
That's more like Algol than Pascal - it is Algol that uses backwards keywords (like 'fi') to mark the end of constructs. The shell uses that, in general. Fun question: why is the end of a loop in Bourne shell marked by 'done' and not 'od'? –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 7 '09 at 4:11
3  
Because 'od' stands for Octal Dump, which was a utility in Unix Seventh Edition. –  kmarsh Aug 7 '09 at 12:41
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I like this example, it uses the macro to approximate the value of PI. The larger the circle, the more accurate the approximation.

#define _ -F<00||--F-OO--;
int F=00,OO=00;main(){F_OO();printf("%1.3f\n",4.*-F/OO/OO);}F_OO()
{
            _-_-_-_
       _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
  _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
 _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
  _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
        _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_
            _-_-_-_
}

Another is the c program

c

To compile you need to define c as

-Dc="#include <stdio.h> int main() { char *t =\"Hello World\n\"; while(*t) putc(*t++, stdout); return 0; }"
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Coroutines (AKA Stackless threads) in C. :) It's Evil trickery.

#define crBegin static int state=0; switch(state) { case 0:
#define crReturn(i,x) do { state=i; return x; case i:; } while (0)
#define crFinish }
int function(void) {
    static int i;
    crBegin;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        crReturn(1, i);
    crFinish;
}

int decompressor(void) {
    static int c, len;
    crBegin;
    while (1) {
        c = getchar();
        if (c == EOF)
            break;
        if (c == 0xFF) {
            len = getchar();
            c = getchar();
            while (len--)
            crReturn(c);
        } else
        crReturn(c);
    }
    crReturn(EOF);
    crFinish;
}


void parser(int c) {
    crBegin;
    while (1) {
        /* first char already in c */
        if (c == EOF)
            break;
        if (isalpha(c)) {
            do {
                add_to_token(c);
    	crReturn( );
            } while (isalpha(c));
            got_token(WORD);
        }
        add_to_token(c);
        got_token(PUNCT);
    crReturn( );
    }
    crFinish;
}
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switch (device_id)
{
#ifndef PROD_1
#ifndef PROD_2
#ifdef PROD_3
  case ID_1:
#endif

#ifdef PROD_4

#ifdef PROD_5
  case ID_2:
  case ID_3:
  case ID_4:
#elif defined(PROD_4)
#ifndef PROD_6
  case ID_1:
#endif // PROD_6
  case ID_5:
#endif

  case ID_6:
#endif

#ifdef PROD_7
  #ifndef PROD_8
    case ID_7:
  #endif
#endif

(names changed to protect the not so innocent)

Notice that we haven't even gotten to any code yet, this is just to get to the first actual bit of code. This actually happens (in almost, but not exactly the same way) for several functions, each of which, in the end only have 4 possible variations (which are also mostly copy/paste with slight variations and #ifdefs of their own).

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#define interface struct

in some of Optima++ headers (Optima++ is/was a Watcom/Powersoft IDE I had to work with).

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1  
One of the Windows header files also #defines interface to something. –  bk1e Sep 19 '09 at 18:02
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#define FLASE FALSE

The programmer was a bad typist, and this was his most common mistake.

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3  
A bad programmer AND a bad typist, that can't be good. –  Cecil Has a Name Sep 18 '09 at 17:04
1  
If I had a buck every time I compiled "unsginged" ... –  Jamie Oct 16 '09 at 14:24
10  
Hey, everoyne nakes miskates! –  Konamiman Oct 20 '09 at 11:13
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Have to do this from memory, but was about like this: Working with a lib for writing Symbian apps. Hidden in a header file you needed to include was this little gem:

// Here come the register defines:
#define C <something>
#define N <something>
<two more single letter defines>

In our code the loading of a file with a hardcoded filename failed. When we changed the file location from C to D drive, it magically worked...

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#define unless(cond) if(!cond)
#define until(cond) while(!cond)

Used:

unless( ptr == NULL) 
    ptr->foo();
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6  
Not even safe: unless (a + b == c) does not do what you think! –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 18 '09 at 13:38
6  
Safer if changed to: #define unless(cond) if(!(cond)) #define until(cond) while(!(cond)) –  Joel Sep 19 '09 at 9:18
2  
That's actually from Perl, so I can see what the author is getting at. Not evil actually (disregarding Jonathan's comment, which isn't difficult to fix), but quite readable (I can't say the same for the rest of the language) –  new123456 Jan 24 '11 at 2:23
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The worst I've seen is in my current project where there are a whole lot of cases of:

#if PROGRAMA
     .
     .
    if(...)
    {
     .
     .
     .
#else
    .
     .
    if(...)
    {
     .
     .
     .
#endif
     }

Yeah, he closes 2 opens with a single close.

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When I first came across macros in C they had me stumped for days. Below is what I was faced with. I imagine it makes perfect sense to C experts and is super efficient however for me to try and work out what exactly was going on meant cutting and pasting all the different macros together until the whole function could be viewed. Surely that's not good practice?! What's wrong with using a plain old function?!

#define AST_LIST_MOVE_CURRENT(newhead, field) do { \
typeof ((newhead)->first) __list_cur = __new_prev; \
AST_LIST_REMOVE_CURRENT(field); \
AST_LIST_INSERT_TAIL((newhead), __list_cur, field); \
} while (0)
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Related to Raymond's rant is the following horrible (in my opinion, of course) macro:

#define CALL_AND_CHECK(func, arg) \
    int result = func(arg);       \
    if(0 != result)               \
    {                             \
        sys.exit(-1);             \
    }                             \

I was pretty new to the practice of using macros and used this macro, but I expected the function that I passed to it to fail. And I was doing it in a background thread, so it stumped me for days why my entire app was "crashing".

As an aside, if only std::tr1::function was around when this macro was written, I would have a week of my life back!

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Good macros: (although personally I dislike the double parentheses required to use this syntax; I prefer either vararg macros (C99 only) or something like PRINTF_0, PRINTF_1, etc, depending on the number of arguments)

#ifdef DEBUG
#define PRINTF(x) printf x
#else
#define PRINTF(x)
#endif

Reduces code size / execution time (the first more than the second) for non-debug build; also prevents leaking debug text strings which may pose a smallish security risk

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Anything using sendmail and its magic configuration syntax

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I'm adding another one that has started to annoy me over time:

#define ARRAYSIZE(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof((x)[0]))

And that's if they get it right; I've seen versions with all possible permutations of parenthesis present or not. I've seen it defined twice in the same header file.

Mainly my argument applies to Windows (though I assume other OS SDKs have something similar), where just about everyone seems to feel the need to define this macro in their project's header, and I don't understand why.

WinNT.h (which is included by Windows.h) defines a very nice version that does some template voodoo to cause compile time errors if you pass a pointer type instead of an array.

Of course it falls back to exactly what I wrote above if you are building a C program, but I would still not redefine something the SDK has by default for no reason.

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2  
I don't have a problem with the idea, just use the one that comes with your SDK. If you want to save typing, try #define DIM(x) ARRAYSIZE(x). –  jeffamaphone Oct 16 '09 at 15:23
1  
If you're writing code on windows, you're already dragging in windows.h. Unless you're writing small console apps and the like. I mean, you can try to stick to just the crt functions, but eventually you'll want to do something you need win32 for. –  jeffamaphone Jun 9 '10 at 2:39
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I once put together this horrifying C++ code which used macros to help hook functions into the import table of DLLs.


#define ARGLIST(...) __VA_ARGS__

#define CPPTYPELESSARG(typelessParams) thisptr, typelessParams
#define CPPTYPEDARG(typedParams) void* thisptr, typedParams
#define CPPTYPELESSNOARG thisptr
#define CPPTYPEDNOARG void* thisptr

#define CPPHOOKBODY(hookName, params) void *thisptr; \
    __asm { mov thisptr, ecx } \
    return On##hookName ( params );


#define CHOOKBODY(hookName, typelessParams) return On##hookName( typelessParams );

#define CPPHOOK(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams) \
    HOOKIMPL(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, CPPTYPEDARG(typedParams), typelessParams, \
    typedParams, __thiscall, __stdcall, CPPHOOKBODY(hookName, CPPTYPELESSARG(typelessParams)))

#define CPPHOOKNOARG(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams) \
    HOOKIMPL(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, CPPTYPEDNOARG, typelessParams, \
    typedParams, __thiscall, __stdcall, CPPHOOKBODY(hookName, CPPTYPELESSNOARG))

#define CDECLHOOK(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams) \
    HOOKIMPL(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams, \
    typedParams, __cdecl, __cdecl, CHOOKBODY(hookName, typelessParams))

#define CDECLFUNC(name, address, returnType, args) \
    typedef returnType (__cdecl *name##Ptr)(args); \
    name##Ptr name = (name##Ptr) address;

#define CPPFUNC(name, address, returnType, args) \
    typedef returnType (__thiscall *name##Ptr)(void* thisptr, args); \
    name##Ptr name = (name##Ptr) address;

#define STDFUNC(name, address, returnType, args) \
    typedef returnType (__stdcall *name##Ptr)(args); \
    name##Ptr name = (name##Ptr) address;

#define STDHOOK(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams) \
    HOOKIMPL(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams, \
    typedParams, __stdcall, __stdcall, CHOOKBODY(hookName, ARGLIST(typelessParams)))

#define HOOKIMPL(InjectHookRef, importLib, importFunc, hookName, returnType, typedParams, typelessParams, hookParams, fnPtrCall, hookCall, hookBody) \
    	typedef returnType (fnPtrCall *##hookName##OrigPtr )( typedParams ); \
    	class hookName : public IHook \
    	{ \
    	public: \
    		typedef hookName##OrigPtr func_type; \
    	private: \
    		static void* m_origFunction; \
    		static bool m_bModifyImport; \
    		static std::string m_lib; \
    		static std::string m_importFunc; \
    		static std::string m_sHookName; \
    		static returnType hookCall hookName##FnHook ( hookParams ) \
    		{ \
    			hookBody \
    		} \
    		static bool	ImplIsModifyImport() { return hookName::m_bModifyImport; } \
    		static void ImplSetModifyImport(bool bModify) { hookName::m_bModifyImport = bModify; } \
    		static const std::string& ImplGetLibName() { return hookName::m_lib; } \
    		static const std::string& ImplGetImportFunctionName() { return hookName::m_importFunc; } \
    		static void ImplSetOriginalAddress(void* fn) { hookName::m_origFunction = fn; } \
    		static void* ImplGetOriginalAddress() { return hookName::m_origFunction; } \
    		static returnType On##hookName ( typedParams ); \
    		static void* ImplGetNewAddress() { return hookName::##hookName##FnHook; } \
    		static const std::string& ImplGetHookName() { return hookName::m_sHookName; } \
    	public: \
    		hookName() \
    		{ \
    			InjectHookRef.AddHook((IHook*)this); \
    			hookName::m_lib = importLib; \
    			hookName::m_importFunc = importFunc; \
    			hookName::m_sHookName = #hookName; \
    			hookName::m_origFunction = NULL; \
    			hookName::m_bModifyImport = true; \
    		} \
    		virtual bool IsModifyImport() const { return hookName::ImplIsModifyImport(); } \
    		virtual void SetModifyImport(bool bModify) { hookName::ImplSetModifyImport(bModify); } \
    		virtual const std::string& GetHookName() const { return hookName::ImplGetHookName(); } \
    		virtual const std::string& GetLibName() const { return hookName::ImplGetLibName(); } \
    		virtual const std::string& GetImportFunctionName() const { return hookName::ImplGetImportFunctionName(); } \
    		virtual void* GetOriginalAddress() const { return hookName::ImplGetOriginalAddress(); } \
    		virtual void* GetNewAddress() const { return hookName::ImplGetNewAddress(); } \
    		virtual void SetOriginalAddress(void* fn) { hookName::m_origFunction = fn; } \
    		static func_type GetTypedOriginalAddress() { return reinterpret_cast(hookName::m_origFunction); } \
    	}; \
    	void* hookName::m_origFunction = NULL; \
    	bool hookName::m_bModifyImport = false; \
    	std::string hookName::m_lib; \
    	std::string hookName::m_importFunc; \
    	std::string hookName::m_sHookName; \
    	static hookName g##hookName##Inst;

Which in turn allowed me to do this:

CPPHOOK(gIH, "SimEngine.dll", "?AddEntity@Player@@UAEXPAVEntity@@@Z", PlayerAddEntity, void, void* ent, ent);

/* Called when the engine calls Player::AddEntity(entity) */ void PlayerAddEntity::OnPlayerAddEntity(void *thisptr, void *ent) { unsigned int id = getPlayerID(thisptr);

gIH.GetLog()->Info("Player %d adding entity %s.", 
	getPlayerID(thisptr), getEntityName(ent));

gPlayers[id] = thisptr;

/*if( id == 2 && gPlayers[1] && gPlayers[2] )
	EntitySetOwner::GetTypedOriginalAddress() (ent, gPlayers[1]);*/
//gEnts[ent] = Entity(ent, Vector3f());

PlayerAddEntity::GetTypedOriginalAddress() (thisptr, ent);

}

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#define "CR_LF" '\r'

That confused the hell out of me for a while!

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A past employer found there were no implementations of BASIC-PLUS on modern Unix systems, so they tried to re-implement it using C pre-processor macros:

#define IF if(
#define THEN ) {
#define ENDIF }
#define GOTO goto L

...etc.

Horrific.

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This is taken from a popular open source program. In fact it makes some parts of the code more readable by hiding the ugly legacy.

#define EP_STATUS    CASTLING][(BOARD_FILES-2)
#define HOLDINGS_SET CASTLING][(BOARD_FILES-1)

I guess there is nothing really bad here, I just find it funny.

http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/xboard.git/tree/common.h

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See this answer re how a dyslexic colleague made life easier for themselves with a common header file full of things like #define fasle false.

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#define PROCESS_AND_RETURN(X) \
X.process(); \
// Important: Return only after invoking virtual method process() \
return X

Due to "Important" comment, the macro never returns the object and CRASH!

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Another piece of 'creative' use of the preprocessor, though it is more in the terminology employed than in the mechanics (which are incredibly mundane):

/***********************************************************************
 * OS2 and PCDOS share a lot of common codes.  However, sometimes
 * OS2 needs codes similar to those of UNIX.  NOTPCDOS is used in these
 * situations
 */

#ifdef OS2
#define PCDOS
#define NOTPCDOS
#else /* OS2 */
#ifndef PCDOS
#define NOTPCDOS
#endif /* PCDOS */
#endif /* OS2 */

Genuine code - I thought I'd removed it, but apparently not. I must have done so out in some temporary branch and not gotten permission to check it back into the main code. One more item for the 'to do' list.

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Try to debug big project that really loves macros, and there is a lot of macros that calls other macros that calls other macros etc etc. (5-10 levels of macros was not that uncommon)

And then top it up with a lot of #ifdef this macrot #else that macro, so if you follow the code it like a tree of different paths it can go.

The only solution is most cases was to precompile and read that instead....

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I agree that for the most part, macros are horrible to use, but i have found a few instances where they have been useful.

This one is actually brilliant IMHO, as you can only get something similar with sprintf, which then requires resource allocations and whatnot, plus, all work is done entirely by the preprocessor

// Macro: Stringize
//
//      Converts the parameter into a string
//
#define Stringize( L )  		#L


// Macro: MakeString
//
//      Converts the contents of a macro into a string
//
#define MakeString( L ) 	Stringize(L)


// Macro: $LINE
//
//      Gets the line number as a string
//
#define $LINE   				MakeString( __LINE__ )


// Macro: $FILE_POS
//
//      Gets the current file name and current line number in a format the Visual Studio
//  	can interpret and output goto
//
// NOTE: For VS to properly interpret this, it must be at the start of the line (can only have whitespace before)
//
#define $FILE_POS   			__FILE__ "(" $LINE ") : "

The other that I loathe to use, but find it extremely useful is doing something like this, which basically allows me to quickly generate templates that have a variable number of template parameters

#define TEMPLATE_DEFS    typename ReturnType
#define TEMPLATE_DECL   ReturnType
#define FUNCTION_PARAMS void
#define FUNCTION_PASS   
#define GENERIC_CALLBACK_DECL_NAME  	CallbackSafePointer0
#include "Callback.inl"

#define TEMPLATE_DEFS   typename ReturnType, typename P1
#define TEMPLATE_DECL   ReturnType, P1
#define FUNCTION_PARAMS P1 param1
#define FUNCTION_PASS   param1
#define GENERIC_CALLBACK_DECL_NAME  	CallbackSafePointer1
#include "Callback.inl"

#define TEMPLATE_DEFS   typename ReturnType, typename P1, typename P2
#define TEMPLATE_DECL   ReturnType, P1, P2
#define FUNCTION_PARAMS P1 param1, P2 param2
#define FUNCTION_PASS   param1, param2
#define GENERIC_CALLBACK_DECL_NAME  	CallbackSafePointer2
#include "Callback.inl"

#define TEMPLATE_DEFS   typename ReturnType, typename P1, typename P2, typename P3
#define TEMPLATE_DECL   ReturnType, P1, P2, P3
#define FUNCTION_PARAMS P1 param1, P2 param2, P3 param3
#define FUNCTION_PASS   param1, param2, param3
#define GENERIC_CALLBACK_DECL_NAME  	CallbackSafePointer3
#include "Callback.inl"

// and so on...

Although this makes it kind of horrible to read "Callback.inl", it does completely eliminate rewriting the same code with a different number of arguments. I should also mention that "Callback.inl" #undefs all of the macros at the end of the file, hence, the macros themselves won't interfere with any other code, it just makes "Callback.inl" a little harder to write (reading and debuging isn't too hard though)

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The worst abuses (and I'm guilty of doing this occasionally) is using the preprocessor as some sort of data file replacement, ie:

#define FOO_RELATION \  
BAR_TUPLE( A, B, C) \  
BAR_TUPLE( X, Y, Z) \

and then somewhere else:

#define BAR_TUPLE( p1, p2, p3) if( p1 ) p2 = p3;
FOO_RELATION
#undef BAR_TUPLE

which will result in:

if( A ) B = C;
if( X ) Y = Z;

This pattern can be used to do all sorts of (terrible) stuff... generate switch statements or huge if else blocks, or interface with "real" code. You could even use it to ::cough:: generate a context menu in a non-oo context menu system ::cough::. Not that I'd ever do anything so lame.

Edit: fixed mismatched parenthesis and expanded example

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At the time it seemed like a good idea to "pass" a macro as an argument into another macro. (I just couldn't stand the thought of defining a list of values in multiple places.) The code here is contrived (and not very motivating), but gives you the idea:

#define ENUM_COLORS(CallbackMacro) \
    CallbackMacro(RED)   \
    CallbackMacro(GREEN) \
    CallbackMacro(BLUE)  \
    // ...

#define DEFINE_COLOR_TYPE_CALLBACK(Color) \
    Color,

enum MyColorType {
    ENUM_COLORS(DEFINE_COLOR_TYPE_CALLBACK)
};

void RegisterAllKnownColors(void)
{
#define REGISTER_COLOR_CALLBACK(Color) \
    RegisterColor(Color, #Color);

    ENUM_COLORS(REGISTER_COLOR_CALLBACK)
}

void RegisterColor(MyColorType Color, char *ColorName)
{
    // ...
}
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Found in declarations, to much confusion:

NON_ZERO_BYTE         Fixed(8)  Constant('79'X),

Found later:

IF WORK_AREA(INDEX) = ZERO_BYTE THEN  /* found zero byte */ 
   WORK_AREA(INDEX) = NON_ZERO_BYTE ; /* reset to nonzero*/
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It's not a C macro but...

Many years ago I had the fun task of porting the original Transport Tycoon from the PC to the Mac. The PC version was written entirely in assembler so we had to go through the whole source code and port it to 'PC' C code first and then port that to the Mac. Most of the code was OK, even object orientated in places. However, the world rendering system was unbelievable. For anyone who's not played the game, the world can be viewed at one of three zoom levels. The code for this was something along the lines of:

macro DrawMacro <list of arguments>
   a couple of thousand lines of assembler with loads of conditionals
   based on the macro arguments

DrawZoomLevel1:
   DrawMacro <list of magic numbers>

DrawZoomLevel2:
   DrawMacro <list of more magic numbers>

DrawZoomLevel3:
   DrawMacro <list of even more magic numbers>

We must have been using a slightly older version of MASM as the macro would crash the assembler when we tried to assemble it.

Skizz

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